Black Tennessee Mayor Curtis Hayes Declares April Confederate History Month

(Image: From left to right Norman Osburn, Michael Boswelll Junior Matthews, Mayor Curtis Hayes, Bill Speck, Bill Heard, Tommy Phillips)
(Image: From left to right Norman Osburn, Michael Boswelll Junior Matthews, Mayor Curtis Hayes, Bill Speck, Bill Heard, Tommy Phillips)

Last week, Mayor Curtis Hayes, a Black recipient of an NAACP diversity award, signed a proclamation delegating April Confederate History Month in Livingston, Tennessee.

During the announcement, mayor Hayes was joined by six white members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV).

According to the Daily Mail, there is no party affiliation on record for Mayor Hayes.

While the SCV’s website condemns racism while commemorating the history of the Confederacy, it is clear that the Confederacy fought loud and proud in support of slavery, sought to continue slavery, and left the U.S. after the inauguration of Abraham Lincoln. Southern states saw slavery as a material interest and were heavily dependent on a plantation system of enslaved Africans to pick cotton. The Confederacy suspected President Lincoln would free the slaves, which he ultimately did.

Tennessee joins a larger body of states already commemorating the Confederacy. According to News4Jax, Apr. 26 legally remained Confederate Memorial Day in Florida last year. Georgia removed the holiday from its official state calendar in 2016 after the Charleston, S.C. church shooting—though it remains a state holiday.

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Source: Black Enterprise