U.S. states push to surpass world emissions norms on aviation

WASHINGTON/MONTREAL, Oct 6 (Reuters) – U.S. President Joe Biden’s administration should exceed global standards designed to curb emissions from flights, as pressure mounts to limit the sector’s greenhouse gases, five states told the White House in a letter seen by Reuters.

Major plane and engine makers joined airlines this week in committing to a non-binding net zero emissions target by 2050, but environmentalists say governments must step up regulatory efforts for such goals to be effective.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should apply global aircraft emissions standards to planes at domestic U.S. airports, said a letter from the states seen by Reuters to White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy, the EPA and the Federal Aviation Administration.

The Biden administration did not immediately comment.

The EPA should move ahead of the U.N.’s aviation agency in approving standards to curb greenhouse gases and air pollution from new aircraft engines entering into service after 2030, said the letter from Illinois, Massachusetts, Oregon, California and Minnesota and International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT).

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Source: Reuters