The Pandora Papers’ political fallout grows

© Aris Oikonomou/AFP/Getty Images Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis in Brussels on Feb. 20, 2020. (Aris Oikonomou/AFP/Getty Images)
© Aris Oikonomou/AFP/Getty Images Czech Prime Minister Andrej Babis in Brussels on Feb. 20, 2020. (Aris Oikonomou/AFP/Getty Images)

A day after the release of the Pandora Project, the fallout is still threading its way around the globe. The Washington Post and other news organizations exposed the involvement of political leaders, examined the growth of the industry within the United States and demonstrated how secrecy shields assets from governments, creditors and those abused or exploited by the wealthy and powerful.

The findings were drawn from a trove of confidential information, the largest of its kind, that was obtained by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which organized the investigation involving 600 journalists around the world.

On Sunday, my colleagues charted how King Abdullah II of Jordan spent more than $100 million, in secret, on luxury homes in various parts of the United States. They also exposed a waterfront home in Monaco acquired by a Russian woman who gained considerable wealth after she reportedly had a child with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Other financial records linked to more than 300 current and former politicians and public officials from around 91 countries and territories are part of the ICIJ’s investigation. In its wake, authorities in Australia, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Mexico, Pakistan, Panama, Spain and Sri Lanka have already announced probes into the new findings.

Click here to read more.
Source: MSN