Black-owned Businesses at Minneapolis Intersection Where George Floyd Was Killed Are Struggling Financially and Plead for Help from Police Amid Rising Crime and Violence

Families and their children visit George Floyd Square during the Derek Chauvin trial. / 0Reuters

Black-owned businesses at the intersection where George Floyd was killed by police last year — now known as George Floyd Square — say they are in dire straits.

Black merchants near the once-thriving corner of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue said police have abandoned the blocked-off intersection, creating a dangerous autonomous zone that has seen crime spike and business evaporate.

“The city left me in danger,” the owner of Smoke In The Pit restaurant told The Post Thursday.

“They locked us up on here and left us behind,” said the merchant, who asked to be identified only as Alexander W. for fear of reprisals.

“They left me with no food, no water, nothing to eat,” he said. “The police, fire trucks, can’t come in here.”

On Thursday the intersection was essentially abandoned — save for the occasional gawker who posed for photos in front of a mural outside Cup Foods, the convenience store where Floyd allegedly passed a counterfeit $20 bill.

At least five stores along one block are shuttered. Owners and workers at most of the stores that do remain open were too afraid to comment to The Post.

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SOURCE: New York Post, Elizabeth Rosner and Jorge Fitz-Gibbon