Daniel Whyte III to Queen Elizabeth: It Has Already Begun, Repent Now or Your Kingdom Will End After Your Death; Teachers Join Protests at Pimlico Academy as Pupils Demand Union Jack Flag be Torn Down and Scrawl ‘run by Racists’ on Walls After New Head Tried to Add Kings and Queens to History and forced Transgender ‘Boy’ to Do PE with Girls. “Thou Art The Woman.”

Queen Elizabeth, what many monarchs, presidents, popes, premiers, and prime ministers do not understand is that when you choose to sanction and endorse a policy that is diametrically opposed to the word of God and the will of God such as sanctioning and endorsing homosexuality and homosexual marriage and in your case being the head of the Church of England you trigger a devastating reaction from God Almighty that causes plagues, rebellion, and destructive war against you unless you do what God’s word says and humble yourself, pray, seek God’s face, and turn from your wicked ways and repent. Queen Elizabeth, follow the Pope who repented of the direction he was going in and that is towards sanctioning homosexuality and homosexual marriage, because he understands that this worldwide plague will not end and will get worse and chaos will break out all around the world if he didn’t repent of endorsing homosexuality and homosexual marriage as he is the head of the Catholic Church. You are the head of the Church of England and you need to do likewise, otherwise I assure you that your kingdom will come to an end after you die, and yes, Queen, I still love you, respect you, admire you, and pray for you. However “Thou Art The Woman.”.

Mutiny erupted at a London school today as pupils protested against the new head’s ‘back to basics’ regime, with calls for u-turns on policies to toughen up discipline and adopt a traditional history curriculum emphasising kings and queens – as teachers caved in to demands to take down the Union flag.

Hundreds of pupils and parents gathered outside Pimlico Academy this morning holding Black Lives Matter flags and chanting ‘we want change’ as several police officers watched on. The protest – which took place just three weeks after schools returned – was originally meant to take place on a football pitch in the grounds, but this was allegedly locked shut by staff.

Opposition, which includes staff threats to strike, was originally focused on a uniform regime, introduced by new head Daniel Smith last August that banned hairstyles that ‘block people’s view’. Critics claimed this would penalise Muslims and people with Afro hairstyles at a school where three quarters of children are from ethnic minorities.

But the rebellion has now extended to include other policies viewed as ‘discriminatory’ by the protesters, including changes to the history curriculum to make it more chronological, which protesters say emphasises white kings and queens over BAME figures.

The British flag was removed and burnt by pupils in September before being put back up, and on the weekend anti-flag graffiti appeared on the school walls reading ‘Ain’t no black in the Union Jack’, ‘White schools for brown kids are u mad’ and ‘Pimlico Academy…run by racists…for profit’.

The school is run by Future Academies, a multi-academy trust which was set up by Conservative peer Lord Nash, who is on the board with his stockbroker wife Caroline. They are both on the local governing body for Pimlico Academy along with Paul Smith, Sarah Richardson and Daniel Woodruffe.

Protesters at the school – ranked ‘outstanding’ by Ofsted at the last inspection in 2011 – today released an extraordinary statement railing against ‘racism, Islamophobia and transphobia’ and said they were also angry about the lack of recognition for Black Lives Matter or Black History Month.

In a long list of demands, they complained about changes to the uniform policy, including an alleged ban on ‘colourful’ hijabs, and claimed that a transgender boy had had been forced to do PE with girls.

The list was presented to senior staff by six protesters. The trio of leadership figures, which included headteacher Daniel Smith, CEO of Future Academies Paul Smith and vice-principal Tony Oulton, agreed to the demands and took down the Union flag pending a review.

Other changes will be made when pupils return after the Easter break, a statement from Mr Smith said.

Future Academies founder Lord Nash had a career in venture capital before serving as a Conservative Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Schools and joined the House of Lords in 2013.

His wife, Lady Nash, is a co-chair of governors, and together they run the ‘Curriculum Centre’, which began working with Pimlico Academy in 2012 and helps decide what pupils will be taught across the academy chain.

The programme centres on a traditional education, including ‘ancient history’ and ‘British history’. Over the last two years, it has launched common curriculum programmes in English Literature, English grammar, history, science, maths and Latin.

The Future Academies’ curriculum is based upon seven principles of curriculum design, tailoring programmes to be ‘knowledge-rich, ‘domain-specific’, ‘coherent’, ‘cumulative’, ‘academically challenging’, ‘written with memory in mind’, and ‘written for novices, not experts’.

Its ‘British History’ programme, available on the Future Academies website, outlines a study plan for ‘Great Events and People from British History’, from ‘Augustine’s Mission’ to ‘The Trial and Execution of Charles I’.

It covers significant events and individuals which have shaped the country, including Alfred the Great; The Norman Conquest; Henry II and Thomas Becket; Richard the Lionheart and Saladin the Merciful; and King John and Magna Carta. Also included are Edward I and the Conquest of Wales; The Peasants’ Revolt; Henry’s ‘Great Matter’; The Spanish Armada; and The Gunpowder Plot.

Speaking this morning, one female student in year 12 telling the Guardian she had been inspired by Black Lives Matter to ‘speak out’ over the ‘abrupt’ changes to school policies since Mr Smith arrived in July 2020. ‘In light of Black Lives Matter, we do think that it was a responsibility of the students to speak to them and show support, as it was a very traumatic time for many of us’.

Even teachers have joined the uprising against Mr Smith, with up to 30 said to be planning to leave at the end of the year, and a vote of no confidence in him by the National Education Union last night. It is not clear if any teachers attended the protest today.

Mr Smith had emailed parents to say the last day before the Easter holidays would continue as normal. But with hundreds of students refusing to attend lessons parents were sent another email informing them the school would close at lunchtime. Year groups were sent home on a staggered basis with the school gates locked by 2pm.

It is the latest of a wave of demonstrations to hit British schools in recent weeks, which have included protests over ‘rape culture’ and an uprising by parents at Batley Grammar School in Yorkshire over its decision to show cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

Some parents have also backed the protests, with one mother with two sons in year 9 and 11 saying the school had gone ‘downhill’ since the new headteacher joined.

She said one of her sons got a detention because his Afro hair was deemed to break the school dress code. A second parent claimed racism was ‘rife’.

The school has since said press coverage of pupils discontent provided an opportunity for reflection, for ‘engagement in constructive dialogue’ and ‘action for change’.

Mr Smith marked his arrival in July with a punchy open letter to parents, in which he repeated the phrase ‘it is your responsibility’ three times in one paragraph while discussing the need for parents to ensure their children complete homework, dress properly and support the academy leadership.

Former pupils at the school include Chelsea footballer Tammy Abraham, PR executive Matthew Freud and comedian Mo Gilligan.

Non-students joined in the action today, with parents pictured outside the school gates, including one holding a placard which read: ‘I stand with Pimlico students.’

Police officers were also seen on the premises.

The sit-down protest came following reports that a senior member of staff had asked pupils to cancel the action the day before, but this only made the teenagers more determined to take part.

The same flag was previously taken down and burned by pupils last September.

Students claim that concerns over the flag, and recognition of Black Lives Matter or Black History Month have also been repeatedly ignored by school bosses.

In a petition, the students claimed the uniform policy would penalise Muslims and those with afro hairstyles and demanded a change.

A statement accompanying the petition said: ‘We as students have the right to express ourselves however we choose, and also have the right to have our natural hair weather it be big hair small hair or loads of facial hair or no facial hair. We should be able to show our shoulders without ‘distracting the boys’.

‘We should be able to wear jewellery as some can be sentimental. We should be able to wear any coloured Hijabs we want as its part of a lot of people’s religion.

‘We should be able to have a clothing option for people who don’t want to conform to a gender. We should be able to wear as much make up as we like as it improves self confidence.

‘From year 11 up, we are more worried about what is going to happen to exams and grades. We don’t want clothing changes, we want reassurance for our learning.

‘We still have no idea what’s going to happen during this pandemic, yet we know what clothes we can and cannot wear? This only adds more pressure to us to get new clothes and conform to the dress code.’

One pupil told the Guardian ahead of the protest: ‘We believe the school has unfairly targeted groups of students.

‘The school should protect marginalised races, religions and other groups instead of target them.

‘We should see ourselves and our backgrounds represented in our studies.’

Meanwhile a teacher, who has handed in her resignation at the school, told the site she felt staff voices were not being heard.

Future Academies said: ‘This morning Pimlico Academy saw a protest by some students. The majority of students were in classrooms studying as usual throughout the protest.

It is with regret that these matters have come to a head in such a public way. We want to take this opportunity to reassure parents that this is an isolated event, and we are working to resolve the issues raised. We apologise to all children, families and staff for the disruption today.’

Daniel Smith said today following the protests: ‘This morning at Pimlico Academy a student protest took place in the playground. This caused disruption to learning with students taking part in the protest not attending lessons but all students were at all times safe and supervised by staff. Students who did not take part in the protest were able to go to classrooms where they were supervised by staff.

The issue of the flying of the Union flag was discussed at length. We acknowledge that this symbol is a powerful one which evokes often intense reactions. We have listened to the concerns of students, parents and the wider community about it. After Easter, we will conduct a review of this and, as part of that, consult with all the academy’s stakeholders to elicit their feedback. In the meantime, and until that review is concluded, the Union flag will not be flown at the academy.’

Headteacher’s statement caving in to Union flag demands: Daniel Smith praises protesters and says flag will come down ‘pending a review’
This morning at Pimlico Academy a student protest took place in the playground. This caused disruption to learning with students taking part in the protest not attending lessons but all students were at all times safe and supervised by staff. Students who did not take part in the protest were able to go to classrooms where they were supervised by staff.

The right to protest is a civil liberty which, in the United Kingdom, we all enjoy, one that was hard fought-for and which not everyone in the world is fortunate to have. Our students are bright, courageous, intelligent young people, passionate about the things that matter to them and acutely attuned to injustice. I admire them hugely for this though I regret that it came to this.

There was, naturally, press interest in this morning’s events and I wanted to write to you now to explain what happened at the academy today and to summarise the outcomes of discussions which took place with representatives of the student body.

The issue of the flying of the Union flag was discussed at length. We acknowledge that this symbol is a powerful one which evokes often intense reactions. We have listened to the concerns of students, parents and the wider community about it. After Easter, we will conduct a review of this and, as part of that, consult with all the academy’s stakeholders to elicit their feedback. In the meantime, and until that review is concluded, the Union flag will not be flown at the academy.

Students were vocal in their concerns about how they felt the PSHE curriculum was delivered. I, too, having reviewed the contents of that curriculum carefully, feel that now is the moment to begin long-overdue discussions that will lead to a significant updating of that programme. I look forward to working with students and external agencies to map out a new programme, one that will address contemporary issues and will ensure that students are better able to navigate the world safely and healthily. The ‘current affairs’ aspect of that programme, already in place, will likewise ensure that students are able to discuss issues that are, truly, current.

Sixth Form student representatives raised concerns about certain aspects of the academy’s Uniform Policy. I was able to reassure students that their previous representations on these points had been the motivation for reflection which, in turn, resulted in revision to the relevant polices taking place. These redrafted policies are the ones I shared with you this morning and remain available to download below.

The murder of Sarah Everard has re-started a national conversation about women’s safety and sexual assault. Recent articles in the press and the foundation of the website ‘Everyone’s Invited’ have triggered all schools to reflect seriously on the processes in place when allegations of sexual assault are made by students. As I said in my letter this morning, I am confident that we have in place here rigorous systems for the reporting and handling of such matters. However, there is no room for complacency and so we will also review again our safeguarding procedures, working alongside statutory bodies to ensure they are as robust as possible. I am conscious though that concerns around women’s safety and sexual assaults are best handled by challenging toxic attitudes which often provide the conditions for such things. I will therefore, as part of the PSHE review, be ensuring that we teach students to recognise the equality, dignity and individual identity of all.

I want to conclude by apologising: to students who continue to inspire me daily and who have not always had their voices listened to closely enough; to my colleagues, the staff at Pimlico Academy, who continue to serve the students with such overwhelming dedication during difficult times; to parents and carers who, we know, always have the best interests of their children at heart and; to the wider community with whom we are committed to working positively with in the future. This is a moment for me and the Leadership Team to reflect deeply and to plan carefully so that, going forward, all who work and learn here can feel confident about doing so in a positive, scholarly, respectful environment.

The past twelve months have presented untold challenges to individuals, to communities, and to the world at large. I am privileged to lead an academic community that is committed to fulfilling its pledge that, regardless of the challenges which come our way, every child should attain freedom through education.

Source: Daily Mail