U.S. reports record single-day spike of 60,000 new coronavirus cases

The United States reported more than 60,000 new Covid-19 cases on Tuesday, setting a fresh record for new cases reported in a single day, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The country reported 60,021 newly confirmed cases over the previous 24 hours as outbreaks continue to expand across a number of states, mostly across the American South and West. Arizona, California, Florida and Texas have accounted for nearly half of all new cases in the U.S. in recent days.

The record spike comes after daily new cases fell below 50,000 over the past few days, though some public health officials warned there could be a backlog of reporting due to the July Fourth holiday weekend. The U.S. has reported about 51,383 new cases on average over the past seven days, a record high seven-day average, up nearly 24.5% compared with a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by Johns Hopkins.

Top health officials, including White house health advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci have lamented in recent days that while many other countries succeeded in shutting down and reducing daily new cases to a manageable level, the U.S. has failed to do the same.

“The European Union as an entity, it went up and then came down to baseline,” Fauci said Monday during a Q&A discussion with Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health. “Now they’re having little blips, as you might expect, as they try to reopen. We went up, never came down to baseline, and now it’s surging back up. So it’s a serious situation that we have to address immediately.”

Fauci said last week that the U.S. is “not in total control” of the coronavirus pandemic and daily new cases could surpass 100,000 new infections per day if the outbreak continues at its current pace.

“I can’t make an accurate prediction but it’s going to be very disturbing,” Fauci told senators at a June 30 hearing held by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. “We are now having 40-plus-thousand new cases a day. I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around, and so I am very concerned.”

But the U.S. probably isn’t diagnosing all infections in the country, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, because some people remain asymptomatic and never get tested. Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, has said the U.S. is probably diagnosing 1 in 10 cases.

Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb, however, said earlier this week that the U.S. is probably catching an even smaller portion of all infections because some areas with major outbreaks don’t have enough resources to test everyone who wants to be tested.

“The CDC says we’re diagnosing 1 in 10 now,” he said Monday on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.” “We’re probably more like 1 in 12 because these states are getting pressed and we’re falling behind.”

Cases were growing, on average, by at least 5% in 37 states as of Tuesday, according to a CNBC analysis of data collected by Johns Hopkins. CNBC uses a seven-day trailing average to smooth out spikes in data reporting to identify where cases are rising and falling.

Coronavirus-related hospitalizations are also up, on average, by at least 5% in 24 states, according to CNBC’s analysis of data compiled by the Covid Tracking Project, an independent volunteer organization launched by journalists at The Atlantic.

Source: CNBC