After Historic Midterms, Black Women Exercise New Power Going Into 2020 Election

Women attending the Black Women's Roundtable summit March 14, 2018, head to Senate offices in Washington to discuss issues that affect communities of color. (Photo: Deborah Barfield Berry, USA TODAY)
Women attending the Black Women’s Roundtable summit March 14, 2018, head to Senate offices in Washington to discuss issues that affect communities of color. (Photo: Deborah Barfield Berry, USA TODAY)

After historic midterms, when they helped Democrats recapture the House of Representatives, women of color are moving fast to leverage their newfound political clout for the 2020 presidential election.

They’re hosting a presidential forum – in a bold move to get national candidates to recognize their influence – while ramping up get-out-the-vote efforts and preparing more women to run for Congress.

“There’s never been a moment for women of color in politics like there is now,” said Aimee Allison, president and founder of She the People, a national network. “It’s kind of like there’s a big awakening.”

After years of complaining that national political parties have not done enough to fund their turnout efforts or to support black female candidates, some groups are raising the money to do it themselves.

“We are demanding a return on our voting investment,” said Glynda Carr, co-founder of Higher Heights, which supports black female candidates and more black political involvement.

That has paid off.

“We have seen women step up in the entire political ecosystem. It’s not only running for office. We see women step up and running campaigns, being the press secretaries, being the finance director,” said A’shanti F. Gholar, political director at Emerge America, which trains Democratic female candidates. “We have also seen women start several organizations that support candidates, which is extremely important because we know not every woman is going to want to run for office.

“All of those things are finally coming together.”

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SOURCE: Deborah Barfield Berry, USA TODAY