The Media Ignores This Side of the Story Out of Charlottesville

A couple hold hands as the participate in prayers at the intersection where Heather Heyer was killed last year as they mark the anniversary of the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Va., Sunday, Aug. 12, 2018. On that day, white supremacists and counterprotesters clashed in the city streets before a car driven into a crowd struck and killed Heyer. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

The one-year anniversary of the melee in Charlottesville, Virginia came and went recently. A poll found that most Americans feel that race relations in this country have worsened. Writing for cbsnews.com (8/12/18), Anthony Salvanto pens, “One year after the deadly rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, most Americans feel racial tensions have grown over the past year.”

Indeed, on the first anniversary of the melee, even an NBC news reporter and crew got attacked by Antifa in Charlottesville. Newsbusters of the Media Research Center reports (8/12/18): “Late Saturday night, NBC News reporter Cal Perry and his crew were in the thick of it as Antifa members ganged up on them and attacked. The next morning, NBC’s Sunday Today ignored the attack and suggested the media was simply ‘heckled’ by their assaulters.” Apparently this was not an isolated incident of violence by Antifa, et al.

Meanwhile, there’s another side to Charlottesville that I wish would get the same kind of attention as did the negative events. The media generally ignores this story.

Christian leaders in Charlottesville, black and white, have organized a series of measures, including bi-racial prayer services, to bring about healing for the city. This included a prayer walk around the city with a black minister (Rev. Alvin Edwards) and a white minister (Rev. Mark Beliles) holding hands. Bishop Harry Jackson spoke at that event late last year. Their website, Healing4Charlottesville.com, documents the various steps churches are taking for racial healing in that city.

I’ve written about this before, but what I found to be the most significant aspect of Healing 4 Charlottesville has been the fact that more people from that city participated in the Christian prayer services on December 1 and 2 than people from Charlottesville participated in the big brawl on August 12. Meanwhile, over this last weekend, they had additional Healing4Charlottesville prayer events.

One of those who helped Dr. Mark Beliles to coordinate these series of services is Rev. Travis Witt, whom I interviewed recently.

Witt told me, “Like so many things, [racial healing] can be slow. It can be tedious. It can be frustrating. But there’s movement in a good direction in Charlottesville.”

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SOURCE: Christian Post, Jerry Newcombe