Jerry Newcombe: Who Died and Made the Supreme Court God?

To hear some liberals tell it, you would think that America is finished as a nation with the retirement of Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy. One such person tweeted: “Literally in tears. Haven’t felt this hopeless in a long time. With Justice Kennedy leaving, we now have two options as Americans: get fitted for your Nazi uniform or report directly to your death camp. How do you fight the darkness without light? My spark is going out.”

California Senator Kamala Harris said that Trump’s replacement for Kennedy (whoever that will be—unknown as of this writing) means the “destruction of the Constitution of the United States.”

These sentiments are terribly wrong on so many fronts. The founders created an experiment where “we the people” would govern ourselves. But in recent decades the high court has taken upon itself more power than King George III could possibly have lusted after. In fact, the swing voter on the Supreme Court—the now-retiring Anthony Kennedy—often experienced such power.

But the founders clearly felt that both a monarchy and an oligarchy (the rule by a few) were tyrannical. James Madison, a key architect to the Constitution, put it this way: “The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny.”

However, through the years, we have experienced the Supreme Court virtually governing our lives, and we assume that’s the way it is supposed to be.

Consider what the courts, especially the Supreme Court, have ushered in during the last several decades by legislating (not adjudicating) from the bench:

• Pornography on demand, Roth v. United States (1957) and Miller v. California (1973).

• No school prayer allowed, Engel v. Vitale (1962) and Murray v. Curlette (1963).

• No official Bible reading of a devotional nature in schools, Abbington v. Schempp (1963).

• Abortion on demand, through Roe v. Wade (1973), which dissenting Justice Byron White called an act of “raw judicial power.” Roe was based on a series of lies, and before she died, the “Roe” in this case, Jane McCorvey, became a pro-life activist who tried in vain to get the case overturned.

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Source: Christian Post