Hawaii’s Kilauea Volcano Still Collapsing, Erupting After Nearly Two Months

A stream of lava from the Kilauea volcano pours into the Pacific at the Kamokuna entry point, triggering explosions that throw bits of the molten substance back onto the top of the sea cliff.
Image by U.S. Geological Survey, via Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

People on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dealing with the eruptions and collapse events from the Kilauea volcano for almost two months now. Activity at the summit of the volcano continues with collapse events, and lava is still flowing from the island’s Fissure 8.

Friday morning in Hawaii, there was a collapse explosion that sent a plume of volcanic material into the sky and drifting southwest of the summit according to the United States Geological Survey. But the levels of sulfur dioxide, the gas that Kilauea releases, were actually down from where they had been when the volcano first started erupting.

The next morning, there was another collapse event. That event occurred after about 15 hours of elevated seismic activity around the summit. It resulted in a steam plume that went about 500 feet in the air, similar to the previous explosion.

After the explosive events, the seismicity in the area dropped significantly by about two-thirds. Prior to the events, there were about 30 to 35 earthquakes an hour resulting from the volcanic activity, after the collapse events that dropped to 10 or less for a short period before the activity increased again, according to the USGS.

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SOURCE: Newsweek, Nina Godlewski