White Yale Student Who Called Cops On Sleeping Black Classmate Nearly Has her Ph.D., Believes Racism is ‘Silly’, Thinks ‘Some Slaves Didn’t Want to be Free’

Sarah Braasch was thrust into the international spotlight after social media users identified her in a livestream.
Sarah Braasch was thrust into the international spotlight after social media users identified her in a livestream.

The white Yale University grad student who called the cops on a black student napping in the common room of her dorm has expressed vehement opposition to hate crimes legislation and had called racism a “silly” social construct in years-old online posts.

Sarah Braasch was thrust into the international spotlight after social media users identified her in a livestream recorded by Lolade Siyonbola. Siyonbola posted the clips to Facebook after Braasch phoned authorities and reported her for sleeping on a couch in the Hall of Graduate Studies early Tuesday morning.

“I have every right to call the police, you cannot sleep in that room,” Braasch told her.

The livestream, which shows Siyonbola’s interactions with both Braasch and officers, have sparked widespread outcry and allegations of racial profiling.

Braasch, who did not return a request for comment, has previously been accused of calling authorities on another student of color. And her online presence is rife with controversial perspectives on race, religion and human rights.

Here are a few things we know about her:

Human rights lawyer with multiple degrees

Braasch is slated to complete her Ph.D. in philosophy in 2020, according to Yale University’s website.

The school did not return request for comment about Braasch’s status at the university Friday.

“Her secularism and women’s rights advocacy (including with Ni Putes Ni Soumises in Paris, France) led her to obtain an MA in Philosophy, to address the sub-human legal status of the world’s women at the source, the philosophical foundations of law,” her bio reads.

The 43-year-old graduate student already has a pair of engineering degrees — aerospace and mechanical — from the University of Minnesota and a JD from Fordham. Braasch is also a staunch First Amendment advocate and lawyer.

“Her 30th birthday brought into focus her desire to become an international human rights lawyer, with a focus on women’s sexual and reproductive rights,” according to San Francisco State’s website, where Braasch was previously a master’s candidate in philosophy.

Civil War and pro-slavery arguments

In a since-deleted 2010 blog post for Humanist, Braasch offered her readers a look at her middle school years, when her class debated the pros and cons of slavery. She said students approached it as if they were “abolitionists or southern plantation owners during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency.”

“I was placed on the pro-slavery side of the argument. I remember spending many an hour in the local public library poring over Time Life books,” she wrote.

“And then I had a eureka moment. Some — not many, but some — of the slaves didn’t want to stop being slaves. A small number wanted to remain with their owners or even return after being freed. I knew I had just won the debate. And indeed, I did. I led our team to victory.”

She continued: “Who are we to tell someone that she has to be free? Who are we to tell someone that she has to be regarded as fully human?”

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SOURCE: JESSICA SCHLADEBECK
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS