Undated photo of Charlie Gard provided by his family, at Great Ormond Street Hospital, in London. FAMILY OF CHARLIE GARD VIA AP
Undated photo of Charlie Gard provided by his family, at Great Ormond Street Hospital, in London. FAMILY OF CHARLIE GARD VIA AP

A major New York hospital has offered to admit Charlie Gard, the terminally ill infant at the center of a worldwide controversy that has drawn sympathy and support from Pope Francis and President Trump.

New York Presbyterian Hospital and Columbia University Irving Medical Center said they would admit and evaluate Charlie “provided that arrangements are made to safely transfer him to our facility, legal hurdles are cleared, and we receive emergency approval from the FDA for an experimental treatment as appropriate,” the hospital said Thursday in an email statement to The Washington Post.

The U.S. hospital said another option could be to ship the experimental drug to London’s Great Ormond Street Hospital, where Charlie is currently being treated, and provide instructions on administering it to the 11-month old child, provided the FDA gives clearance.

A Great Ormond spokeswoman did not immediately respond to a request for comment over the American hospital’s offer.

Charlie’s story has captured worldwide attention as his parents, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, fought in court to be able to try an experimental treatment in the United States to save their son. The case was taken to the European Court of Human Rights, which declined to hear the matter last week, upholding previous court rulings that the therapy would not help him and it was in his best interest to prevent further suffering by withdrawing life support.

Great Ormond planned to disconnect the terminally ill infant from life support and, recently, declined a request by Vatican’s children’s hospital to move him to their facilities.

A hospital spokesman in Rome told The Post on Wednesday that the British hospital turned down the offer, citing legal reasons, but officials were working on a solution.

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SOURCE:   
The Washington Post

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