President Trump, PM May Call for Tougher Measures in Response to London Attacks

British security was stepped up after the Saturday night attack on London Bridge, where police encountered three knife-wielding terrorists who appeared to be wearing suicide belts and who had killed seven people and wounded dozens of others. (Associated Press)
British security was stepped up after the Saturday night attack on London Bridge, where police encountered three knife-wielding terrorists who appeared to be wearing suicide belts and who had killed seven people and wounded dozens of others. (Associated Press)

The gruesome van-and-knife rampage in London spurred calls Sunday on both sides of the Atlantic for further homefront offensives in the war on terrorism, with Prime Minister Theresa May endorsing a crackdown on pockets of Islamic extremism in the United Kingdom and President Trump renewing his push for a temporary travel ban in the U.S.

British police arrested a dozen people in the wake of the attack, in which three men in a van mowed down pedestrians late Saturday on London Bridge and then went on a stabbing rampage in a nearby market neighborhood.

The three terrorists — one of whom was reported to have screamed, “This is for Allah” — were gunned down by police.

In eight horrific minutes, seven people were killed and 48 others wounded. British police said 21 remained in critical condition Sunday night.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility in a statement distributed through its Amaq News Agency, saying the attack was carried out by “a detachment of Islamic State fighters.”

Mrs. May, who faces an election Thursday, said the third major attack in two months demanded tougher counterterrorism measures, including closing down terrorist websites and ending Britain’s longtime tolerance of extremism in Muslim communities.

“It is time to say, ‘Enough is enough,’” Ms. May said outside No. 10 Downing St. “When it comes to taking on extremism and terrorism, things need to change.”

While authorities do not believe the three recent attacks were coordinated, the prime minster said, “They are bound together by the single, evil ideology of Islamist extremism that preaches hatred, sows division and promotes sectarianism.”

Mrs. May said the elections would proceed as planned.

 

Her call for a crackdown on radical Islamic recruiters on the internet was echoed in the U.S. by Sen. Lindsey Graham, South Carolina Republican and a leading defense hawk.

“There’s a gap in our laws,” Mr. Graham said. “We’re going to have to take down their recruiting networks. We have to look at the fact that we are at war and part of the battlefield is in cyberspace.”

The bloodshed in London was the third terrorist attack in the U.K. in two months, including a suicide bombing less than two weeks ago at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester that killed 22 people, many of them girls and young women.

Click here to continue reading…

SOURCE: Dave Boyer and S.A. Miller
The Washington Times