Congressional Budget Office says Republicans’ Repeal of ObamaCare Would Leave 23 Million More Uninsured

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and House Republican leadership speak to reporters after a closed-door House Republican Conference meeting, at the Republican National Committee, on Wed., March 8.
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and House Republican leadership speak to reporters after a closed-door House Republican Conference meeting, at the Republican National Committee, on Wed., March 8.

Republicans’ ObamaCare replacement bill that passed the House would result in 23 million fewer people with health insurance over 10 years, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in an analysis released Wednesday.

The total is slightly less than the CBO’s accounting of a previous version of the bill.

The CBO also found that an amendment allowing states to waive certain regulations would mean premiums would be somewhat lower than in the previous version of the bill, and slightly more people would get coverage, because they are buying plans that cover fewer healthcare services.

The bill would reduce the deficit by $119 billion over 10 years — less than the $150 billion reduction the CBO predicted in the previous version of the bill.

The CBO found that a controversial amendment from Rep. Tom MacArthur (R-N.J.) would have a significant effect. That provision allows states to waive rules governing what an insurance plan must cover, and allows states to let insurers charge people more based on their health.

The CBO found that in states that let insurers charge sick people more, some people with pre-existing conditions would lose coverage because they could not afford the premiums, despite extra funding provided in the bill meant to mitigate that.

The CBO projected that a substantial number of people would live in states that took advantage of the new waivers for ObamaCare regulations.

It projects that one-sixth of the population would live in states that took full advantage and waived both rules. People with pre-existing conditions in those states would have difficulty affording coverage, the CBO found.

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SOURCE: PETER SULLIVAN  
The Hill