Will Liberal Churches See Higher Church Attendance Because of Trump’s Election?

(PHOTO: REUTERS/ERIC THAYER) Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at an American Renewal Project event at the Orlando Convention Center in Orlando, Florida August 11, 2016.
(PHOTO: REUTERS/ERIC THAYER)
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at an American Renewal Project event at the Orlando Convention Center in Orlando, Florida August 11, 2016.

While the debate continues over the exact fallout that will come from the election of Donald Trump, one group may reap an unexpected benefit: progressive Christians.

At a mid-August campaign stop in Florida, Trump told a group of conservative pastors that they would see higher church attendance if he is elected president. It may be liberal churches, however, that see a boost in attendance.

United Methodist Church attendance was about twice the average the Sunday after the election, Emma Green reported Dec. 11 for The Atlantic.

“Anecdotal evidence suggests other liberal churches from a variety of denominations have been experiencing a similar spike over the past month, with their higher-than-usual levels of attendance staying relatively constant for several weeks,” Green wrote.

“… it suggests that some progressives are searching for a moral vocabulary in grappling with the president-elect — including ways of thinking about community that don’t have to do with electoral politics.”

Bishop John Selders, vice chair of the board for the theologically liberal Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, believes that there has been an upsurge in support since Trump’s victory.

In an interview with The Christian Post, Bishop Selders said that he believed it was part of a larger trend in American politics, going back at least for the past few decades.

“I think we can take a recent step back into history to see that every time the larger broader secular community makes a swing either to the left or to the right, the religious community in the most broadest way, swings the opposite direction,” said Selders.

“It goes kind of back and forth. What we are seeing certainly in preparation to the president-elect’s coming into office is the same kind of story.”

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SOURCE: The Christian Post
Michael Gryboski