Denzel Washington Praises Obama Family for Being “a Class Act” in the White House: “They Did the Country Proud”

LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 06:  Actor Denzel Washington speaks onstage during the Hamilton Behind The Camera Awards presented by Los Angeles Confidential Magazine at Exchange LA on November 6, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. at Exchange LA on November 6, 2016 in Los Angeles, California.  (Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for LA Confidential)
LOS ANGELES, CA – NOVEMBER 06: Actor Denzel Washington speaks onstage during the Hamilton Behind The Camera Awards presented by Los Angeles Confidential Magazine at Exchange LA on November 6, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. at Exchange LA on November 6, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by John Sciulli/Getty Images for LA Confidential)

Fences star, director and producer joked about unsubstantiated reports that he was a Trump supporter (believe “a tenth of what you read”) at the event hosted by the city’s former mayor, Willie Brown, and attended by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi.

As Denzel Washington stepped onto the red carpet on Thursday night for the San Francisco premiere of Fences, a night hosted by the city’s former mayor, Willie Brown, the star already had racked up a stellar week: Golden Globe and SAG Awards nominations for him and for the film, which he produced and directed, and sitting strong on Oscar prediction lists. But the event had Washington — arguably the most handsome man ever to play the Pittsburgh garbageman Troy Maxson — thinking back to nearly 40 years ago, when he was a MFA theater student working across this very San Francisco street at a cafeteria called Salmagundi’s.

“I was the soup guy!” he gleefully told reporters lined up in the tent in front of the Curran Theatre. “I never got to go into the theater: I couldn’t afford the show.” Washington continued the tale at the panel discussion after the screening to a packed crowd that included House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Tom Waits. “I said one day, I’m gonna be in that theater,” he recalled. “It took me 39 years, but I’m here.”

San Francisco — and the Curran specifically — also marks a homecoming for Fences. Playwright August Wilson’s work first was staged at the Curran in 1987 before moving to Broadway, and its later screenplay adaptation by Wilson was picked up by Paramount and producer Scott Rudin and Todd Black. The event also marked the grand reopening of the Curran itself, which has been under reconstruction for the duration of “two-and-a-half pregnancies,” as its owner, Broadway producer Carole Shorenstein Hays, put it on the red carpet. She was the sole backer of the play in its 1987 run at the theater before taking it to Broadway, and co-produced the Broadway revival with Rudin starring Washington in 2010 (she is not a producer on the film).

The film, released on Christmas Day and having started limited screenings in New York and Los Angeles Thursday, also comes at a fraught racial moment for the country, as the first black president is packing up to pass the White House to a white man whose platform was seen by many as a rebuke to racial progress and pluralism. In such Trumpy times, Henderson told THR, stories like Fences are important than ever: “This is one of those really wonderful plays that makes you realize family will sustain you: Knowing your heritage and legacy is gonna get you through whatever times. These things come and go,” he said, referring to politics. “You have to keep on steppin’. Great art prepares you for that.” He said he was proud of “the class act” Obama family: “They did the country proud. The work’s ahead of us.”

THR asked Washington what his character Troy Maxson — embittered from having his life’s opportunities limited by racism — would make of a President Obama. “You know what Troy would have said?” Washington answered, using his gruff Maxson voice: “Obama ain’t nobody! I could be president right now! Oh, there ain’t nothing to it! You know just get two or three cabinet members, and tell ’em what to do!”

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SOURCE: Lauren Smiley 
The Hollywood Reporter