North Dakota Law Officers Ask President Obama to Send Federal Help in Policing Pipeline Protests

Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe's protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River nearby, September 4, 2016 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Protestors were attacked by dogs and sprayed with an eye and respiratory irritant yesterday when they arrived at the site to protest after learning of the bulldozing work. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn BECKROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
Native Americans march to a burial ground sacred site that was disturbed by bulldozers building the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s protest of the oil pipeline that is slated to cross the Missouri River nearby, September 4, 2016 near Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
Protestors were attacked by dogs and sprayed with an eye and respiratory irritant yesterday when they arrived at the site to protest after learning of the bulldozing work. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn BECKROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

A dozen law enforcement officials in North Dakota are imploring President Barack Obama to send federal officers to help control protests against the Dakota Access pipeline.

In a letter released Monday, the officers ask Obama to send 100 Border Patrol agents and members of the U.S. Marshals Service Special Operations Group. They say the federal help would help defray the costs and help relieve fatigue among state and local law enforcement officers

Nearly 575 pipeline opponents have been arrested since August in and around the state capital Bismarck and a demonstrator encampment along the pipeline route.

The pipeline is stalled while developer Energy Transfer Partners and the Army battle in court over permission to cross under the Missouri River. But law officers say the situation is still volatile.

Obama has said his administration is monitoring the situation.

SOURCE: AP