Amnesty International: Sudan Army Used Chemical Weapons In Darfur

A handout picture released on Feb. 9, 2016 by the United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) shows internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Sortoni, in Sudan's North Darfur state, who fled their homes following ongoing clashes between armed movements and government forces in the Jebel Marra area, a stronghold of the rebel Sudan Liberation Army. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)
A handout picture released on Feb. 9, 2016 by the United Nations-African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) shows internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Sortoni, in Sudan’s North Darfur state, who fled their homes following ongoing clashes between armed movements and government forces in the Jebel Marra area, a stronghold of the rebel Sudan Liberation Army. (Stringer/AFP/Getty Images)

A human-rights monitor says it can prove Sudan’s army is using chemical weapons against young children in Darfur. Amnesty International claims the “horrific evidence” includes satellite images and interviews. It contends that about 30 chemical attacks occurred in the past eight months in an area called Jebel Marra, injuring dozens and killing 250 civilians. At least one of the chemicals is a blister agent, according to the human-rights group. “The use of chemical weapons is a war crime,” said Tirana Hassan, Amnesty International’s director of crisis research. “The evidence we have gathered is credible and portrays a regime that is intent on directing attacks against the civilian population in Darfur without any fear of international retribution.” Sudanese officials have called the report “utterly unfounded.” The United Nations estimates 300,000 people have died so far in the country’s conflict, which began in 2003.

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SOURCE: The Daily Beast Cheat Sheet