In Contrast with ’08, HIllary Clinton’s Christian Faith Mostly Absent from Campaign

Hillary Clinton hasn’t hidden her Methodist upbringing, but scholars say it’s not front and center.
Hillary Clinton hasn’t hidden her Methodist upbringing, but scholars say it’s not front and center.

Hillary Clinton’s Christianity, which she wielded as a political weapon in her 2008 Democratic presidential primary campaign, largely has been missing in this year’s election.

She hasn’t hidden her Methodist upbringing, but scholars say it’s not front and center. And where in the past she used it as a window into her character, this year she’s deployed it as a debate tactic to push criminal justice reform and other policy goals.

Church attendance also has been all but absent from Mrs. Clinton’s schedule, except when she’s turned up behind a pulpit to stump for votes, particularly in predominantly black churches, where her appearances focus largely on how she intends to work with religious leaders to accomplish shared political objectives.

Since 2008 she’s also abandoned traditional Christian positions on issues such as same-sex marriage, coming in favor of the practice in 2013 after years of opposing it.

The reason for the shift, analysts say, is twofold. Mrs. Clinton is taking on an opponent, Republican Donald Trump, who is seen as one of the most nonreligious presidential candidates in modern history. Pew polling from earlier this year found that just 30 percent of American voters say they consider Mr. Trump religious, while 48 percent said the same about Mrs. Clinton.

Perhaps more importantly, she now leads a party that, among its white base, if not its core black and Hispanic members, has become an increasingly secular institution. Recent polling shows the Democratic Party includes in its ranks nearly four times as many atheists and agnostics as the GOP.

“She’s in a difficult position in terms of articulating her faith because she faces a fractious Democratic coalition. We are in a moment in our country’s life where the coalition the Democrats have had to cobble together is really conflicted with respect to matters of religion,” said Joseph Prud’homme, director of the Institute for the Study of Religion, Politics and Culture at Washington College.

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SOURCE: Ben Wolfgang
The Washington Times