Fraternal Order of Police Claim Chicago Police Department Violating Due Process of 7 Officers

CHICAGO, IL - OCTOBER 20:  In this still image taken from a police vehicle dash camera released by the Chicago Police Department on November 24, 2015 ,  Laquan McDonald walks up a street just prior to being shot by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke on October 20, 2014  in Chicago, Illinois. Officer Van Dyke was charged  with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets.  (Photo by  Chicago Police Department via Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 593610563
CHICAGO, IL – OCTOBER 20: In this still image taken from a police vehicle dash camera released by the Chicago Police Department on November 24, 2015 , Laquan McDonald walks up a street just prior to being shot by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke on October 20, 2014 in Chicago, Illinois. Officer Van Dyke was charged with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Chicago Police Department via Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 593610563

Fraternal Order of Police President Dean Angelo on Monday accused the Chicago Police Department of violating the due process of seven officers who stand to lose their jobs for allegedly covering up the police shooting of Laquan McDonald

In his long-awaited response to a scathing report by Inspector General Joe Ferguson, Police Supt. Eddie Johnson has moved to fire the seven officers for allegedly violating Rule 14.

That’s the “If you lie, you die” rule that prohibits officers from filing false reports or lying under oath during the course of an investigation.

Angelo complained that none of the seven officers have been told how they lied. That, he said, is a violation of due process.

“They committed a Rule 14 violation based on what? What specifically did they do? What did they say? What did they write that puts them in that category? I don’t know. They don’t know,” Angelo said.

“No one is being served with specifics of what they did wrong. No one told them, `You said this and you should have said that.’ Is that fair? Is that what we’re looking at now? Everybody is concerned about `transparency.’ That’s the new word of the day. Where’s the transparency of this?”

Anthony Guglielmi, chief spokesman for the Chicago Police Department, said that under the city’s contract with the officers, the department will provide them with a breakdown of their potential rule violations once administrative charges for separation are formally brought before the Chicago Police Board, which determines punishment for cops.

“Last week, the Bureau of Internal Affairs met with each of the Chicago Police officers to notify them they were being relieved of their police powers for possible rule violations following the Inspector General’s investigation into the Laquan McDonald case,” Guglielmi said.

“The Chicago Police Department is committed to the highest levels of transparency and works very hard to balance the release of information with the integrity of investigations and the public’s right to know,” he said.

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Source: Chicago Sun Times | Fran Spielman and Frank Main