Charity Auction Bids for Rare Apple 1 Computer Reach $500,000

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA - JUNE 24:  An Apple-1 computer, built in 1976, is displayed during the First Bytes: Iconic Technology From the Twentieth Century, an online auction featuring vintage tech products at the Computer History Museum on June 24, 2013 in Mountain View, California.  Christie's is auctioning off an original Apple-1 computer owned by Ted Perry as part of its First Bytes: Iconic Technology from the Twentieth Century, an online auction of vintage tech products. The online auction begins today and runs through July 9. The Apple-1 is expected to fetch between $300,000 and $500,000. (PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA – JUNE 24: An Apple-1 computer, built in 1976, is displayed during the First Bytes: Iconic Technology From the Twentieth Century, an online auction featuring vintage tech products at the Computer History Museum on June 24, 2013 in Mountain View, California. Christie’s is auctioning off an original Apple-1 computer owned by Ted Perry as part of its First Bytes: Iconic Technology from the Twentieth Century, an online auction of vintage tech products. The online auction begins today and runs through July 9. The Apple-1 is expected to fetch between $300,000 and $500,000. (PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

If you are a fan of Apple, want to own a piece of tech history and have oodles of cash to burn, you’ll be happy to learn a very rare Apple 1 computer has just found its way on to the auction block.

Apple’s first ever computer, the Apple 1, was originally released in 1976 for the ominous price of $666.66 (equivalent to around $2,770 in today’s money). About 200 Apple 1s were made. Of those, 175 were sold and only around 70 are accounted for today.

The auction is happening right now on fundraising site Charitybuzz, with the highest bid standing at $500,000 — half the site’s estimated value of $1 million. While this number may seem nuts, a similar Apple 1 was auctioned off for $900,000 in late 2014.

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SOURCE: Cnet, Rahil Bhagat