Religion Expert Robert P Jones Says White Christian America Is Dead and Donald Trump’s General Election Loss In November Will Prove It

(PHOTO: REUTERS/JOHN GRESS) A parishioner cries as he signs a song of worship in the 7,000-seat Willow Creek Community church during a Sunday service in South Barrington, Illinois, November 20, 2005.
(PHOTO: REUTERS/JOHN GRESS)
A parishioner cries as he signs a song of worship in the 7,000-seat Willow Creek Community church during a Sunday service in South Barrington, Illinois, November 20, 2005.

In his new book “The End of White Christian America,” billed “quite possibly the most illuminating text for this election year,” Robert P. Jones, founding CEO of the Public Religion Research Institute, says white Christian America is dead and the general election in November could be a referendum on it.

“I begin the book with an obituary for White Christian America, and I conclude the book with a eulogy. This construction is consistent with the book’s stark title. My argument in the book is that we have already experienced the passing of White Christian America,” Jones told The Washington Post in an interview with John Sides, an associate professor of political science at George Washington University who specializes in public opinion, voting, and American elections.

“While this claim is grounded in demographic changes, it is also supported by the fading power of major institutions, such as the National Council of Churches or the Christian Coalition of America. There are no indicators that the country will see the likes of White Christian America as a dominant cultural force again,” he said.

Using a graph created from 2014 data, Jones highlighted the rapid decline in the proportion of white, non-Hispanic Christians across generations.

“Today, young adults ages 18 to 29 are less than half as likely to be white Christians as seniors age 65 and older. Nearly 7 in 10 American seniors (67 percent) are white Christians, compared to fewer than 3 in 10 (29 percent) young adults,” Jones noted.

And while this generational shift in the proportion of white Christians is due in part to changing demographics, Jones explained that it is also due to young adults rejecting organized religion.

“Young adults are three times as likely as seniors to claim no religious affiliation (34 percent versus 11 percent, respectively),” he said.

While this group of unaffiliated Americans have rejected organized religion, Jones was quick to explain that all of them have not rejected God.

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SOURCE: The Christian Post
Leonardo Blair