The Gospel Coalition Pulls “When God Sends Your White Daughter a Black Husband” After Article Generates Much Controversy and Accusations of Persistent Racism In the White Evangelical Community

Mrs Clark wrote: ‘As you pray for your daughter to choose well, pray for your eyes to see clearly, too.’ Pictured are Anna and Glenn
Mrs Clark wrote: ‘As you pray for your daughter to choose well, pray for your eyes to see clearly, too.’ Pictured are Anna and Glenn

A Georgia mother has given some awkward, yet sincere, advice on a Christian blog about what to do when your daughter brings home a black man.

Gaye Clark, a cardiac nurse from Augusta, says all she wanted for her daughter Anna was a husband who was ‘godly’ and ‘kind’ as well as a great father and a good provider.

She describes herself as an ‘open-minded mom’ in her post for The Gospel Coalition – but then ‘God called my bluff.’

‘This white, 53-year-old mother hadn’t counted on God sending an African American with dreads named Glenn,’ she wrote.

Clark notes that not too long ago that interracial marriage – ‘particularly a black man like Glenn marrying a white girl like Anna’ – was considered the ‘ultimate taboo.’

While she insists that she never shared this prejudice, she concedes that was because she never thought the issue would factor in her life.

She accepted Glenn as her son – and so offers her heartfelt guidelines to other parents for ‘when your white daughter brings home a black man home for dinner.’

‘All ethnicities are made in the image of God, have one ancestor, and can trace their roots to the same parents, Adam and Eve,’ she tells them.

‘As you pray for your daughter to choose well, pray for your eyes to see clearly, too.’

She adds that Glenn went from being ‘a black man to a beloved son’ when she recognized him as ‘a brother in Christ.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3732332/Georgia-mom-gives-awkward-advice-Christian-blog.html#ixzz4H0dh6v5e

SOURCE: Daily Mail Co.UK


Responding to a backlash against the controversial article “When God Sends Your White Daughter a Black Husband”, the Gospel Coalition removed the article at the author’s request. TGC also posted an audio discussion about the article involving three African-American writers (TGC editor, Jason Cook, Isaac Adams, and Jamar Tisby). Listen to the discussion at TGC’s website.  About the situation, TGC posted:

In this recorded conversation, Jason Cook (editor at The Gospel Coalition), Jemar Tisby (president of Reformed African American Network), and Isaac Adams (editor at The Front Porch) respond to the article “When God Sends Your White Daughter a Black Husband” and the ensuing backlash, as well as broader issues including handling discussions about race and the dignity of black life.

The article has been removed from TGC’s website at the request of the author, who regrets hurting many readers. An article intended to celebrate God’s work in this family’s life also became an occasion for hurt and pain. Understandable frustration and constructive concern was not the only response. Sadly, white supremacists have threatened the author and her family.

We invite you to listen to the conversation to understand TGC’s editorial process, what we could have done better, what we can learn going forward, and more.

The article (archived here) had generated hundreds of comments on the TGC website in addition to a tweetstorm of discussion both supporting and criticizing the article. In particular, the format of the article’s title indicated to some critics that a black husband was less than optimal. However, in this discussion, the participants talk about what can be learned from the situation.

The discussants took a firm stance on the language of the article and lamented the problems in evangelical circles. One said:

This is an issue where our discipleship has a gaping hole.

I recommend you listen to the conversation.

From my point of view, I appreciate TGC’s recognition that the article was hurtful to many. I think it illustrated just how far the church needs to go in order to address subtle as well as overt racism.

SOURCE: Patheos – Warren Throckmorton