Silicon Valley Writes a Letter Opposing Donald Trump

FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2015, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd gathered in front of Trump Tower ahead of the arrival of the pope's motorcade for an appearance in New York's Central Park. Trump holds a trademark to use the words ìCentral Parkî on items including furniture, chandeliers and even key chains. Records show his first application came in 1991, when the cityís crime rate was near its height and the park had a less-than-glamorous reputation. (PHOTO CREDIT: AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)
FILE – In this Sept. 24, 2015, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd gathered in front of Trump Tower ahead of the arrival of the pope’s motorcade for an appearance in New York’s Central Park. Trump holds a trademark to use the words ìCentral Parkî on items including furniture, chandeliers and even key chains. Records show his first application came in 1991, when the cityís crime rate was near its height and the park had a less-than-glamorous reputation. (PHOTO CREDIT: AP Photo/Kevin Hagen, File)

Silicon Valley techies have made little secret of their dislike for Donald J. Trump. On Thursday, they took their antipathy to the next level.

A group of more than 140 tech entrepreneurs and executives published a scathing online letter opposing Mr. Trump’s campaign for the presidency and criticizing the presumptive Republican nominee for his potentially negative effect on innovation. The letter was signed by tech company chief executives like Stewart Butterfield of Slack and Aaron Levie of Box, as well as Evan Williams, co-founder of Twitter, and Steve Wozniak, an Apple co-founder, among many others.

The letter specifically targeted some of Mr. Trump’s ideas about how to handle issues typically seen as central to Silicon Valley, including immigration, open communication on the internet and investment in technology infrastructure.

“We believe in an inclusive country that fosters opportunity, creativity and a level playing field,” the group stated in the letter. “Donald Trump does not.”

The letter is notable for the show of unity by the diverse cross-section of technology denizens who signed it, who also included venture capitalists, technologists, academics and policy experts. But the letter lacked the signatures of some of the highest-profile figures in technology: the chiefs of the biggest Silicon Valley companies like Apple, Facebook and Google, among others.

Many of the largest tech companies have taken pains to appear impartial in matters of politics. In May, allegations that Facebook was suppressing conservative content in portions of its site sent the company scrambling to repair relations with conservatives.

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SOURCE: NY Times, Mike Isaac