Manhattanhenge Sets the City Alight for the Second and Last Time This Year

The majestic sight occurs twice a year over a two day period - when the setting sun aligns perfectly with Manhattan's grid system, beaming light down the city streets (PHOTO CREDIT: Reuters)
The majestic sight occurs twice a year over a two day period – when the setting sun aligns perfectly with Manhattan’s grid system, beaming light down the city streets (PHOTO CREDIT: Reuters)

Many were left disappointed over Manhattanhenge’s May offering on Memorial Day weekend after clouds completely obscured the sky.

But Monday’s sunset more than made up for May’s grey skies and delighted New Yorkers took to social media to share their snaps.

Sylvan Solloway tweeted: ‘It’s #Manhattanhenge! People are going crazy in the middle of 34th st’

While Phil Torres wrote: ‘#Manhattanhenge was special. No, the view wasn’t clear. But it IS clear science can bring people together.’

Inga Sarda-Sorensen ‏commented: ‘Fiery & fabulous #Manhattanhenge tonight in NYC’.

Joanne Freeman ‏tweeted: ‘I’m in NY today & saw #Manhattanhenge. I LOVE this kind of NYC event, w/packs of people in the street chatting.’

The celestial phenomenon was named Manhattanhenge in 2002 in reference to Stonehenge in Wiltshire, England, which aligns with the rising sun every summer solstice.

Unlike the prehistoric monument, Manhattan gets two dates with the sun each year because its grid system does not line up precisely with the compass points.

The city plan is actually rotated 30 degrees to align with Manhattan’s western edge along the Hudson, which means it gets its first alignment a few weeks before the longest day of the year, and a second the same length of time later.

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SOURCE: Daily Mail, Alexandra Genova