LISTEN: Foundations for Freedom and Faith, Part 1 (A Christian Manifesto Today #8 with Daniel Whyte III)

Pastor and Christian philosopher, Francis A. Schaeffer, warned us and created the war plan that we as Christians need today to deal with a society that is increasingly moving away from God, the Bible, and moral principles. He wrote “A Christian Manifesto” 33 years ago and its words are just as relevant today as they were back then.


Our Christian Manifesto Today passage from the Word of God today is Psalms 33:12 which reads: “Blessed is the nation whose God is the LORD; and the people whom he hath chosen for his own inheritance.”

Our Christian Manifesto Today quote today is from Patrick Henry. He said: “Bad men cannot make good citizens. It is when a people forget God that tyrants forge their chains. A vitiated state of morals, a corrupted public conscience, is incompatible with freedom. No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue; and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles.”

In this podcast, we are using as our text: “A Christian Manifesto” by Francis A. Schaeffer. Dr. Francis A. Schaeffer writes on “Foundations for Freedom and Faith” (Part 1):

The Founding Fathers of the United States (in varying degrees) understood very well the relationship between one’s worldview and government. John Witherspoon has always been important to me personally, and he is even more so since I have read just recently a biography of him by David Walker Woods.’ John Witherspoon, a Presbyterian minister and president of what is now Princeton University, was the only pastor to sign the Declaration of Independence. He was a very important man during the founding of the country. He linked the Christian thinking represented by the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) with the work he did both on the Declaration of Independence and on countless very important committees in the founding of the country. This linkage of Christian thinking and the concepts of government were not incidental but fundamental. John Witherspoon knew and stood consciously in the stream of Samuel Rutherford, a Scotsman who lived from 1600-1661 and who wrote La Rex in 1644. Lex rex means law is king—a phrase that was absolutely earthshaking. Prior to that it had been rex lex, the king is law. In Lex Rex he wrote that the law, and no one else, is king. Therefore, the heads of government are under the law, not a law unto themselves.

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