Pope Francis Names Archbishop Christophe Pierre as New Vatican Ambassador to U. S.

Apostolic Nuncio to Mexico Christophe Pierre, front, and Monsignor Eugenio Lira, general coordinator of the visit of Pope Francis to Mexico, sprinkle holy water on the six vehicles and five popemobiles (not pictured) during an event at the presidential hangar in preparation for the visit of Pope Francis to Mexico City on Feb. 8, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Henry Romero
Apostolic Nuncio to Mexico Christophe Pierre, front, and Monsignor Eugenio Lira, general coordinator of the visit of Pope Francis to Mexico, sprinkle holy water on the six vehicles and five popemobiles (not pictured) during an event at the presidential hangar in preparation for the visit of Pope Francis to Mexico City on Feb. 8, 2016. Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Henry Romero

Pope Francis has named the Vatican’s envoy to Mexico as his new ambassador to the U.S., replacing the Vatican diplomat who sparked controversy last September by setting up a secret meeting between the pontiff and Kim Davis, the Kentucky county clerk who briefly went to jail rather than certify same-sex marriages.

The appointment to Washington of French-born Archbishop Christophe Pierre, now the Vatican’s representative, or nuncio, in Mexico City, was announced by the Holy See on Tuesday (April 12).

The move was widely expected: The current Vatican nuncio to the U.S., Italian Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, turned 75 in January, the date when Catholic bishops must submit their formal request for retirement to the pope.

While the pope can decide to let a churchman remain in office after he turns 75, Vigano was not expected to enjoy such latitude. Church sources say Francis himself was upset that Vigano set up the handshake meeting with Davis in the Vatican Embassy in Washington last September during the pope’s first-ever visit to the U.S.

The pontiff didn’t know who Davis was or what her case represented, and when news of the meeting broke, shortly after Francis returned to Rome, the controversy threatened to overshadow the central themes that Francis was preaching during the visit.

Vigano was initially named to the Washington post in 2011 as a result of another controversy: During the so-called “Vatileaks” scandal, internal memos revealed how he had pushed top Vatican officials — including then-Pope Benedict XVI, who has since retired — to rein in financial waste and corruption. But his plea fell on deaf ears and he was sent to Washington in a sort of diplomatic exile.

While in the U.S., Vigano came to be known as a staunch ally of cultural conservatives in the American hierarchy, strongly supporting the U.S. bishops’ campaigns against gay rights and the Obama administration’s contraception mandate.

In fact, in what was effectively his valedictory speech as Vatican ambassador, Vigano last week told future priests at the main U.S. seminary in Rome that the Catholic Church’s central challenge in America was protecting religious freedom.

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SOURCE: Religion News Service
David Gibson