College Presidents say Student Protests Haven’t Fallen on Deaf Ears

Students at the University of Missouri stand in solidarity following the resignation of University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe amid racism allegations on campus in Columbia, Missouri on Nov. 9, 2015.
Students at the University of Missouri stand in solidarity following the resignation of University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe amid racism allegations on campus in Columbia, Missouri on Nov. 9, 2015.

Racially charged student protests have erupted on college campuses across the country over everything from free speech to Halloween costumes and school mascots. 

And while much of the attention has focused on students and their growing list of demands for more diversity and inclusiveness, comparatively less has been paid to the college presidents and school administrators who are almost always a focus of such protests.

But a sneak peek of a new survey from the American Council of Education provides a glimpse into their views on the current climate, which many have likened to the student demonstrations of the 1960s.

The anonymous online survey of 567 college and university presidents shows that the majority of those at four-year institutions say the racial climate on their campuses is more of a priority today than it was three years ago, and that the majority at both two- and four-year schools say the most prominent actions taken in response have been initiatives aimed at increasing diversity among students, faculty and staff.

85

Overall, 47 percent of presidents at four-year institutions indicated students on their campuses indeed have organized around concerns of racial diversity, and 75 percent believe high-profile events like those connected with the Black Lives Matter movement, the immigration debate and Islamophobia have played a role in increasing dialogue about race.

Click here to read more

Source: US News & World Report | Lauren Camera