With Help Of Civil Rights Activists, Slave-Founded Church Holds “Let Freedom Ring Ceremony” On 240th Anniversary

Civil rights activists Rev. Jesse Jackson, pictured, is expected to be among other activists and actors at a ceremony marking the 240th anniversary of a Williamsburg, Virginia, church founded by slaves. A long-silent church bell has been restored and will ring throughout this year's Black History Month. PHOTO: REUTERS/SAIT SERKAN GURBUZ
Civil rights activists Rev. Jesse Jackson, pictured, is expected to be among other activists and actors at a ceremony marking the 240th anniversary of a Williamsburg, Virginia, church founded by slaves. A long-silent church bell has been restored and will ring throughout this year’s Black History Month.
PHOTO: REUTERS/SAIT SERKAN GURBUZ

 

Rev. Reginald Davis poses in the sanctuary of the First Baptist church in Williamsburg, Va., Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is launching a new appeal to to attract more African-American visitors. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Rev. Reginald Davis poses in the sanctuary of the First Baptist church in Williamsburg, Va., Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2015. The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation is launching a new appeal to to attract more African-American visitors. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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Civil rights activists Danny Glover and the Rev. Jesse Jackson are expected at a gathering Monday to mark the 240th anniversary of a church founded by American slaves. But it won’t be an ordinary ceremony, as the church’s long-silent bell will ring for the first time in decades and will continue to do so throughout Black History Month, the Associated Press reported.

First Baptist Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, will host a ceremony titled “Let Freedom Ring: A Call to Heal a Nation.” The bell, which had sat out of view of churchgoers and passers-by, was recently restored by noted conservators from the Colonial Williamsburg historic site.

“The bell has not rung since the days of segregation,” the Rev. Reginald Davis, pastor of First Baptist since 2004, told USA Today. The idea of sounding the bell on the first day of Black History Month, and amid national strife over racial inequality and police brutality against people of color, is fitting, Davis said.

“It plays very well into what’s going on today,” he said. “We are trying to bring all Americans together and to show that the division, the strife, can be healed. We just have to make a commitment.”

The ceremony also falls on National Freedom Day, which marks President Abraham Lincoln’s 1865 signing of a pact with Congress to pass the 13th Amendment, abolishing slavery.

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SOURCE: International Business Times – Aaron Morrison