Former Brazilian Feminist Apologizes to Christians for Kissing Woman on Cross In Front of Church During Topless Protest

(SCREENGRAB: YOUTUBE/SARA WINTER) Two female feminist activists kiss on top of a cut-out cross in front of a church in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil in January of 2014.
(SCREENGRAB: YOUTUBE/SARA WINTER)
Two female feminist activists kiss on top of a cut-out cross in front of a church in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil in January of 2014.

A former Brazilian feminist turned pro-life activist has apologized to Christians for kissing a woman on top of a cross during a topless protest in front of a Rio De Janeiro church in 2014 and has expressed a desire to return to church for the first time since she was 14.

Sara Fernanda Giromin, who was previously known by the alias “Sara Winter,” founded the feminist group Femen Brazil in 2012 and helped lead countless topless feminist protests in the country that called for LGBT rights and the legalization of elective abortion, which is still illegal in Brazil.

One of the protests organized by Giromin included a rally in front of the Church of Our Lady of Candelária located in Rio De Janeiro in January of 2014. During the protest, a mostly naked Giromin was photographed kissing another mostly naked woman while they were laying on top of a cross that was laid on the ground in front of the church. The photo was shared widely on social media.

Despite her feminist past, Giromin now decries the feminist and abortion movements. She separated herself from the feminist movement after deeply regretting aborting her first child and realizing the beauty of motherhood when she gave birth to her second child last year.

After Giromin released her book, Bitch, No! Seven times I was betrayed by Feminism last month, Giromin posted a video on YouTube on Dec. 15, asking Christians to forgive her for her offensive actions.

“Asking for forgiveness is certainly not an easy thing to do,” Giromin said in Portugese. “We went way too far and ended up offending many religious and non-religious people.”

In a Monday interview with The Christian Post, Giromin explained that her issues with the feminist movement began when it became apparent that feminists in Brazil only cared about one thing — abortion.

Although Giromin said she joined the feminist movement to be a voice for women who are victims of domestic abuse and rape, those issues were not on the agenda of the leading feminist groups that solely focused on pushing abortion-inducing drugs into the hands of scared and desperate pregnant women.

“If you disagree with some part of their agenda, you will be persecuted, totally persecuted, and will be exposed and humiliated,” Giromin stated.

When Giromin became pregnant for the first time, she also turned to her feminist friends who pressured her to take abortion-inducing pills.

“I asked for help in our feminist group and a feminist friend offered me abortion medicines,” Giromin said. “I was really desperate and more than 50 feminists were saying to me ‘If you do it, it will empower your body. If you make an abortion, you will have more experience to speak like a feminist.'”

Giromin took the pills but her feminist friends neglected to tell her of the health risks that could arise from taking such pills. After taking the abortion-inducing drugs, Giromin suffered from life-threatening complications. When she called on her feminist friends to help her get to the hospital, she said they were nowhere to be found.

“I was bleeding so much, I was really, really scared,” she explained. “I called for a feminist friend. I was so desperate in asking for help. I asked for help because I needed to go to hospital but no one helped me.”

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: The Christian Post
Samuel Smith