Here We Go: Homosexuals and Transgenders Call for Boycott of Houston, Including Pushing the 2017 Super Bowl Out of City, After Voters Reject “Equal Rights Ordinance” – Otherwise Known as Letting Transgendered Men In Women’s Bathrooms

F.N. Williams Sr., 86, the pastor of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Houston since 1958, held high his Bible as he reminded a rally opposing a proposed city nondiscrimination ordinance that the civil rights struggle was fought for racial equality, not sexual behavior. Some see the proposed ordinance as encroaching on religious conscience.  Photos by Bonnie Pritchett.
F.N. Williams Sr., 86, the pastor of Antioch Missionary Baptist Church in Houston since 1958, held high his Bible as he reminded a rally opposing a proposed city nondiscrimination ordinance that the civil rights struggle was fought for racial equality, not sexual behavior. Some see the proposed ordinance as encroaching on religious conscience. Photos by Bonnie Pritchett.

In the wake of voters overwhelmingly saying no to the pro-LGBT “Houston Equal Rights Ordinance” (HERO), the LGBT community is calling for a boycott of Texas’ largest city, including possibly pushing the NFL to drive the Super Bowl out of Houston in 2017.

The controversial anti-discrimination ordinance passed by the Houston City Council last year was voted down by a whopping 63 percent of Houstonians who said “No” to Proposition on Tuesday. This was a huge victory for local churches ad pro-family organizations and an embarrassing loss for homosexual activists led by the pro-LGBT group Houston United, which outspent its conservative opposition on the issue five-to-one.

Disgruntled with the loss, Human Rights Campaign (HRC) President Chad Griffin pressed NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell “to discuss the future of nondiscrimination protections in the city” via an emergency meeting over the vote and future courses of action to be taken as a result.

Local attorneys not pleased with the way the democratic vote turned out pointed to the dire consequences that Houston businesses and football fans  could experience for disagreeing with the aggressive measures promoting the LGBT lifestyle that were set to take place throughout America’s fourth largest city.

“[T]here are rumblings of plans to ask the NFL to move and go elsewhere in support of LGBT people,” Houston attorney John LaRue, a vocal supporter of the pro-LGBT HERO legislation, told ABC News.

Despite the ruckus stirred by the LGBT community over the loss and its proposed retaliation, the NFL issued a statement to The Associated Press that its plans for the 2017 Super Bowl will not be affected by voters casting their ballots against the controversial ordinance that would have affected Houston’s 2.2 million residents.

“We will work closely with the Houston Super Bowl Host Committee to make sure all fans feel welcomed at our events,” the NFL promised. “Our policies emphasize tolerance and inclusiveness and prohibit discrimination based on gender, race, religion, sexual orientation or any other improper standard.”

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SOURCE: OneNewsNow.com
Michael F. Haverluck