WATCH: Brazilian Government Employee Caught Skipping Work, Runs from a Reporter; Citizens Find it Hilarious

Edinair dos Santos Moraes, a government worker who fled from a reporter investigating public employees who shirk their jobs. (TV Globo)
Edinair dos Santos Moraes, a government worker who fled from a reporter investigating public employees who shirk their jobs. (TV Globo)

It began as a news report on how some government workers got paid for doing nothing in the legislature of Goias, a state in Brazil’s interior. But the clips of an employee running away from a TV reporter have sparked a national uproar — going viral and inspiring a cellphone game that has been downloaded more than 600,000 times.

In the TV Globo exposé, a reporter attempted to interview a woman who had punched in for work at the state legislature two days running and then headed home via a bakery. On the third day, the program revealed, the woman punched in, then went out for coffee and spent a few hours lazing in a nearby park.

As she left the park, the woman, later identified as Edinair dos Santos Moraes, was approached by a reporter. The interview went like this.

Reporter: “Where do you work?”

Moraes: “Where do I work? At the moment I am unemployed.”

Reporter: “But we have already seen you coming here twice and for the third time this week, Senhora, you go to the assembly, punch in and leave.”

Moraes: “No. I never did this.”

Moraes began hurrying away from the reporter, who followed.

Reporter: “Senhora, you did. We filmed it. Senhora, you were filmed.”

Moraes broke into a run, followed by the reporter.

Reporter: “Senhora, excuse me! Senhora! Are you an assembly employee?”

Moraes: “No!”

Reporter: “Senhora, if you don’t have a problem, why are you running?”

The reporter pursued Moraes down the street — but she escaped. And when the anchors in the studio frowned in disapproval, Brazilians howled with laughter. The scene quickly became an Internet phenomenon. (Here’s the full report; the fun with Senhora starts at the two-minute mark).

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SOURCE: Dom Phillips 
The Washington Post