Why Black Males Have a More Difficult Time in Segregated Schools

Tiffany McLeary, 16, of Silver Spring, a student at Bethesda Chevy Chase High School, holds Amayah Varfley, 3, of Germantown on her shoulders during a March to Close the Gap rally on April 27, 2014. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)
Tiffany McLeary, 16, of Silver Spring, a student at Bethesda Chevy Chase High School, holds Amayah Varfley, 3, of Germantown on her shoulders during a March to Close the Gap rally on April 27, 2014. (Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post)

A new study using federal data finds that black students who attend schools that have a majority of black students score lower on achievement tests than black students who go to school with fewer other black students.

The findings held true after researchers accounted for family income, level of parent education and other factors they thought might impact how students perform on tests.

And they were particularly strong for black males — test scores for black female students were fairly consistent whether they attended schools with many other black students or schools with relatively few, researchers found.

The study, conducted for the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics by the American Institutes for Research, analyzed the test scores of 100,000 eighth-graders on the 2011 math portion of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, also known as NAEP.

The overall black-white achievement gap on the NAEP 2013 math test for eighth-graders was 31 points — equivalent to three years of schooling. That gap has not changed from 2007 to 2013.

Researchers looked at how black students performed on the test and the demographic makeup of their schools. A “high density” black school was defined as a school where at least 60 percent of the students are black. Nationally, these schools were concentrated in Southern and Midwestern cities, researchers found.

The researchers adjusted the test scores for all the factors they thought could affect student achievement, including family poverty, concentration of poverty in a school and credentials of teachers, and they still found the achievement gap between average white males and black males attending a “high density” black school was 25 points, compared to a gap of 17 points for black males who attended schools where blacks made up 20 percent or less than the student body.

Click here to read more

Source: The Washington Post | Lyndsey Layton

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s