Auschwitz Guard Says He Can ‘Only Ask God for Forgiveness’

 Defendant and former Nazi SS officer Oskar Groening, who worked at Auschwitz for nearly two years, attends his trial at the courtroom in the 'Ritterakademie' venue in Lueneburg, Germany, July 1, 2015. (PHOTO CREDIT: Ronny Hartmann/Pool/Reuters)
Defendant and former Nazi SS officer Oskar Groening, who worked at Auschwitz for nearly two years, attends his trial at the courtroom in the ‘Ritterakademie’ venue in Lueneburg, Germany, July 1, 2015. (PHOTO CREDIT: Ronny Hartmann/Pool/Reuters)

Oskar Groening, who served as a guard at Auschwitz during World War II, addressed survivors and families of Holocaust victims in a statement at his trial in Germany on Wednesday, expressing his “humility and guilt” for his role in the atrocities committed at the camp.

The former guard was stationed at one of the Nazi regime’s largest concentration camp complexes for almost two years and faces charges of 300,000 counts of accessory to murder. Now 94 years old, he addressed a court in the northern German town of Lueneburg via a statement read by one of his lawyers.

Groening had previously said he was morally guilty, and he conceded Wednesday that he bore “shared guilt for the Holocaust, although my part was small,” Agence France Presse reported. He maintained, however, that while he was aware of deaths at the camp, he had never killed anyone personally and had made repeated requests to be transferred.

“I’ve consciously not asked for forgiveness for my guilt,” he said in his statement, The Guardian reported. “Regarding the scale of what took place in Auschwitz and the crimes committed elsewhere, as far as I’m concerned I’m not entitled to such a request. I can only ask the Lord God for forgiveness.”

Groening worked at the infamous concentration camp—which has remained a symbol of the Nazis’ extermination of Jews and members of other groups during the Holocaust—from October 1942 until September 1944. Often described as “the accountant of Auschwitz” or “the bookkeeper of Auschwitz,” he sorted money taken from the victims and occasionally served on “ramp duty,” overseeing belongings piled on the selection ramp upon the arrival of a transport. Groening was charged in September with a set of accessory to murder counts that corresponds to the number of Hungarian Jews transported to Auschwitz and gassed upon arrival in the spring of 1944, during his time there. His trial began in April and is tentatively due to end in late July.

Groening, who has heard testimony from Auschwitz survivors during the course of the trial, said in his statement Wednesday that “the events of Auschwitz, the mass murders, were known to me. But many of the details that have been told here were not known to me.”

“What happened in Auschwitz has been brought before my eyes once again,” Groening added. “The suffering of the deportees in the trains, the selection process and the subsequent extermination of the majority of the people has been brought home to me again in the clearest possible way…as well as the terrible living conditions of those who were not murdered immediately.”

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: Newsweek, Stav Ziv

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s