NYPD Official Michael Julian says, Cameras Are ‘Good for the Community’

© North Charleston Police Department/AP In this April 4, 2015, frame from dash cam video provided by the North Charleston Police Department, Walter Lamer Scott leaves his car after a traffic stop in North Charleston, S.C.
© North Charleston Police Department/AP In this April 4, 2015, frame from dash cam video provided by the North Charleston Police Department, Walter Lamer Scott leaves his car after a traffic stop in North Charleston, S.C.

The smartphone can be a cop’s best friend — unless that officer’s name is Michael Slager.

That, in essence, was the message the NYPD’s new training czar tried to impart Monday to officers at the Police Academy at the start of a three-day policing seminar.

“Cameras actually help you,” Deputy Commissioner of Personnel Michael Julian told the Daily News. “Cameras protect you. If you’re doing the right thing, they’re going to help you police the community.”

Julian’s message that beat cops are now under a constant microscope came a week after Slager was fired by the North Charleston Police Department after a cell phone video caught him fatally shooting an unarmed black man in the back.

Julian said he understands what they are preaching to police officers might sound counterintuitive — especially after Slager was charged with murder.

“They think the person with the camera is the enemy, and that’s the problem,” he told The News.

But a good police officer won’t get “jammed up.”

“You’re doing the right thing — and you’re less likely to do the wrong thing because you’re being recorded,” he told The News. “That’s good for you and good for the community. Stop thinking cameras are demonic. They’re actually a help.”

So instead of trying to duck cell phone videos, Julian said cops should “give them a location with a clear view.”

“Here, stand over here,” Julian suggests officers tell whoever is recording them. “Put the person in a better position to film you.”

Julian also wants cops to clean up their language. He said when he first broached the idea to disbelieving officers, he was told by one that he had a “First Amendment right to curse.”

“You’re right, you have that right,” he said. “But the reality is nobody will hire you to curse at their customers in the private sector. We don’t want people to curse at the people, who are our customers.”

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Source: New York Daily News | ROCCO PARASCANDOLA, CORKY SIEMASZKO

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