Differing Responses to Religious Attacks Show Islam and Christianity Are Not Comparable

A Palestinian Salafist burns a French national flag during a protest against the printing of satirical sketches of the Prophet Mohammed by French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 19, 2015 on their way to the French Cultural Centre in Gaza city. The walls of Gaza's French Cultural Center were painted on January 16 with graffitti in reaction to a cartoon published in the latest issue of Charlie Hebdo showing on its cover the prophet Mohammed holding a "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) sign under the headline "All is forgiven". (Photo: MOHAMMED ABED, AFP/Getty Images)
A Palestinian Salafist burns a French national flag during a protest against the printing of satirical sketches of the Prophet Mohammed by French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo on January 19, 2015 on their way to the French Cultural Centre in Gaza city. The walls of Gaza’s French Cultural Center were painted on January 16 with graffitti in reaction to a cartoon published in the latest issue of Charlie Hebdo showing on its cover the prophet Mohammed holding a “Je Suis Charlie” (I am Charlie) sign under the headline “All is forgiven”.
(Photo: MOHAMMED ABED, AFP/Getty Images)

“Christians Have Waged Their Own Holy Wars” was yet another annoying headline, this one in the Miami Herald. It seems that every time someone is beheaded, shot (by children, no less), or burned alive by ISIL, there is this inevitable hand wringing over the violent history of —

Christianity.

Confused? So am I. Precisely what the Crusades or the Inquisition have to do with events in the Middle East is not clear. One suspects that attacking Christianity fits neatly into a domestic agenda. Yes, Christianity is not only Islam’s chief global rival, it is a barrier to the American Cultural Left’s social vision (think abortion and gay marriage). Whatever the motivation, this ignores a serious (and growing) foreign threat.

For their part, Christians, in spite of their supposedly violent natures, have accepted all of this rather passively. Indeed, to be a Christian apologist these days seems to involve a lot of apologizing for being a Christian at all. This alone should be sufficient evidence of Christianity’s peaceful nature. I mean, I don’t hear many Muslims apologizing for the Muslim invasion of Europe (which preceded the Crusades by almost 400 years), for the recent scandal of some 1,400 children systematically raped by Muslim men in Rotherham, England, or for the oppression of women and religious minorities in Islamic states.

Charlie Hebdo is illustrative of my point.

That the magazine lampooned Muhammad we all know. What is little known is that between 2005 and 2015, the magazine devoted 38 covers to obscene and offensive depictions of religion or religious figures. Of those, 21 were aimed at Christianity while only seven targeted Islam. Yet those seven covers netted two terrorist attacks and 16 people dead. Were Christians truly as violent as Muslims, there would have been no less than six Christian attacks on Charlie Hebdo.

There have been none.

There are many other examples of the very different responses Christians and Muslims have had to unflattering depictions of their religion: Martin Scorsese (director of “The Last Temptation of Christ“) is still alive while Theo Van Gogh (director of “Submission”) is dead, shot eight times in the street and a butcher knife left in his chest. Richard Dawkins has made a fortune attacking Christianity and lives handsomely in Oxford while Raif Badawi, the Saudi blogger who was publicly lashed 50 times for his criticisms of Islam, is in jail awaiting 950 more lashes. And Salman Rushdie lives under the perpetual threat of assassination while Rushdie’s friend and fellow writer Christopher Hitchens enjoyed celebrity status among the Christians he denigrated.

The point isn’t that most Muslims are terrorists or would-be terrorists; rather, the point is that many terrorists are Muslim. Some will object that a relatively small percentage of Muslims commit atrocities, but that is beside the point. There are relatively few Ultimate Fighters — but they have a lot of fans. Last week, BBC announced triumphantly the results of a new poll saying, “an overwhelming majority of British Muslims oppose the use of violence against people publishing images of the Prophet Muhammad.”

Click here for more.

SOURCE: USA Today – Larry Taunton

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s