LeBron James to College Coaches: Stop Recruiting My 10-Year-Old Son

Steve Mitchell/USA TODAY Sports LeBron James Jr. joined his father when the elder received his fourth MVP award in 2013.
Steve Mitchell/USA TODAY Sports
LeBron James Jr. joined his father when the elder received his fourth MVP award in 2013.

LeBron James is not thrilled that his son and young basketball standout, 10-year-old LeBron James Jr., has already received letters and even scholarship offers from college coaches.

“Yeah, he’s already got some offers from colleges,” James told CBS Detroit before the Cleveland Cavaliers’ matchup against the Detroit Pistons on Tuesday. “It’s pretty crazy. It should be a violation. You shouldn’t be recruiting 10-year-old kids.”

His son is not alone.

Connecticut star Ryan Boatright committed to USC before he was in high school. Marquette’s Matt Carlino reportedly received an offer from Arizona while he was in elementary school. Michael Avery accepted a scholarship offer from former Kentucky coach Billy Gillispie in 2008, when he was an eighth-grader.

Per the NCAA handbook: “A prospective student-athlete is a student who has started classes for the ninth grade. In addition, a student who has not started classes for the ninth grade becomes a prospective student-athlete if the institution provides such an individual (or the individual’s relatives or friends) any financial assistance or other benefits that the institution does not provide to prospective students generally.”

College coaches are not prevented from monitoring young players like LeBron James Jr., per NCAA rules.

From the NCAA handbook: “In men’s basketball, a coaching staff member may observe an individual who has not entered the seventh grade participating in an athletically related activity, provided such observation occurs during a period when it is permissible to evaluate prospective student-athletes.”

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: ESPN
Myron Medcalf

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