Over 300 Black Lives Claimed by Lynching in Alabama in Span of 73 Years

An FBI poster asking the public for information on the 1946 Georgia lynching at Moore's Ford Bridge in rural Georgia.
An FBI poster asking the public for information on the 1946 Georgia lynching at Moore’s Ford Bridge in rural Georgia.

A history of lynchings in the American South shows more than 4,000 African Americans – including more than 300 in Alabama – lost their lives from 1877 to 1950.

The Montgomery-based Equal Justice Initiative compiled the information in a troubling report that shows the acts of racial violence were even more prevalent than once believed. In Alabama alone, 326 black people were killed during the 73 years span. Jefferson County was the site of 29 lynchings, the 9thhighest rate for counties in the South. Dallas County in Alabama was the site of 25 lynchings, coming in at number 10.

As disturbing as those numbers are, they are not the worst. In one Arkansas county alone – Phillips County – 242 African Americans were killed by lynching from 1877-1950.

This was not “frontier justice” carried out by a few marginalized vigilantes or extremists,” EJI notes. “Instead, many African Americans who were never accused of any crime were tortured and murdered in front of picnicking spectators (including elected officials and prominent citizens) for bumping into a white person, or wearing their military uniforms after World War I, or not using the appropriate title when addressing a white person.”

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Source: AL.com | Leada Gore

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