In Spain, a King’s Crown With a Hidden Surprise Wraps Up the Holidays

The classic Spanish roscón is an aromatic, citrus-infused brioche topped by sugar, flaked almonds and candied fruits – arranged like the jewels on a king's crown. It's ubiquitous on Spanish tables on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6. James Badcock for NPR
The classic Spanish roscón is an aromatic, citrus-infused brioche topped by sugar, flaked almonds and candied fruits – arranged like the jewels on a king’s crown. It’s ubiquitous on Spanish tables on Three Kings Day, Jan. 6.
James Badcock for NPR

The first time I visited my in-laws in Spain, they fed me a sweet, doughy treat that, for a brief moment, made me wonder whether they were trying to kill me.

You see, it was Jan. 6, el Dia de Reyes – or Three Kings Day — which commemorates the visit of the magi to the baby Jesus. My hospitable in-laws had laid out a delicious roscón, a ring-shaped cake delicately flavored with orange blossom water. But as I tucked into this scrumptious offering, my teeth struck something very, very hard.

That something was a small porcelain elephant, which I kept as a treasure for some years. And while some might consider it a choking hazard, in Spain, finding the figurine in my food was a sign of good luck. Such was my introduction to the magic and mystery of the roscón de Reyes.

Reyes is the culmination of Spain’s lengthy holiday period, which is dotted with a series of lavish, celebratory meals. The feasting begins with dinner on Christmas Eve and reaches all the way through to lunch on Jan. 6. That’s the day when children awake to find presents brought by the Three Kings (Los Reyes Magos).

Once upon a time, these gifts of the magi were quaintly deposited in the little one’s shoes. These days, the footwear tends to be completely engulfed by bulky gifts from the East (although that’s likelier to be China than Persia). For the wicked child, however, there is merely a lump of coal – often cheekily included anyhow now that modern confectioneries have come up with very authentic-looking candy coal.

This is a sweet day, and the roscón is as universal a culinary component of a family feast as you will find in Spain. The roscón is nigh-on ubiquitous across Spain during el Dia de los Reyes, but my sample of Spanish families turned up differences as to when, exactly, the roscón makes its appearance: “We always have it for breakfast after opening our presents.” “With lunch on the 6th.” “In my house, we had roscón in the afternoon with hot chocolate.”

The figurine inside — sometimes religious in nature, such as an angel, sometimes as random as my elephant — is meant to signal fortune in the year to come.

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SOURCE: NPR
James Badcock

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