LISTEN: It’s Okay to March and Protest, but We As a People Need to Get Our Own House in Order (The Torch Leadership Foundation’s Cross in Culture Podcast #11 with Daniel Whyte III)

Daniel Whyte III
Daniel Whyte III

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On the same day of the march on Washington for justice for the unarmed black men who are being killed in America by police, on CNN, Martin Luther King III, was asked what he believes his father’s response would be to all that is happening today. He said that Dr. King “would have to raise the issue not just of police brutality and misconduct, but brutality and misconduct within our own communities. I think he would raise that issue because he always talked about loving each other, sharing, caring, lifting each other up. All of that, I think, must be discussed while the nation’s attention is galvanized.”

This weekend saw tens of thousands of people taking part in protests over recent grand jury decisions not to indict police officers for the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner. The protests were loud calls for “justice” to be done in these cases, as well as the cases of other unarmed young black men who have been killed by law enforcement, including: John Crawford III, Akai Gurley, and Tamir Rice among others. Chanting, “Black lives matter,” “I can’t breathe,” and “Hands up, don’t shoot,” many are using the marches and demonstrations to express their frustration with the police killings of young black men and a justice system that seems unable to hand down the justice they seek. Now, the protesters are calling for federal action and federal legislation to resolve these matters.

While I support those who use their right to peacefully protest all across this nation to help solve a very serious problem, I must say that we, as a community, do not want to become so focused on this one issue that we gloss over the many enormous problems that black Americans face. On the same day of the protests, on CNN, Martin Luther King III, was asked what he believes his father’s response would be to all that is happening today. He said that Dr. King “would have to raise the issue not just of police brutality and misconduct, but brutality and misconduct within our own communities. I think he would raise that issue because he always talked about loving each other, sharing, caring, lifting each other up. All of that, I think, must be discussed while the nation’s attention is galvanized.”

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., would support those who protest against an unfair justice system, but at the same time, he would call on the black community to address the issues that we face internally such as: black on black crime, broken homes and families, and young black people not pursuing their education etc.

They say that over 25,000 people marched in Washington D.C. on Saturday. Thousands more marched in New York City and other places around the nation. Why can’t we get 25,000 people to march against young black men gunning each other down in Chicago? Why can’t we get 25,000 people to attend a commitment rally where fathers and mothers, husbands and wives renew their vows and commit to staying together and raising their children for the glory of God? Why can’t we get 25,000 young people to march together and demonstrate that they will get their education and not waste their lives so they can make a difference in their community?

As one famous song writer so aptly put it many years ago: if we really want to make the world a better place, we have to look in the mirror and make a change. Marching and protesting will not solve our problems altogether. For example, I want you to understand that if you don’t raise your young black sons right, we are living in a society that is increasingly not going to tolerate the disrespect and rebellion that young people put down. If you do not teach your children to obey and respect you as their parent, do not expect that kind of behaviour and attitude toward police officers, or other authority figures. And when your child bows up at a policeman and resists arrest, more than likely, tragedy is going to happen and the policeman is going to walk away alive. We, as black people, have a lot of work to do. We need to get our own houses in order.

It’s good that you marched on Saturday. But on Sunday, let’s march to church and march down the aisle and give your heart to Jesus Christ. On Monday, let’s march our young people to school and let’s march ourselves to work. Let’s march down to the store and buy diapers for your precious child that was born without the benefit of marriage. Next Saturday, let’s march down the aisle and get married, one man to one woman, and commit to raising our children together so they will grow into law-abiding, cool, calm, collected citizens of these United States. And hopefully we will not have to march again.

1 Corinthians 11:31 says, “For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.”

Jim Rohn said, “You must take personal responsibility. You cannot change the circumstances, the seasons, or the wind, but you can change yourself. That is something you have charge of.”

In light of what we have discussed today, I want to remind you that in our ever-changing world, there is one Person who never changes. That person is Jesus Christ. The Bible says that He is “the same yesterday, today, and forever.” He is not subject to the whims of society or popular opinion. He has an unchanging, unconditional, eternal love for you. If you do not know Him as your Savior, I encourage you to get to know Him today. John 3:16 says, “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.” Just believe in your heart that Jesus Christ died for your sins, was buried, and rose from the dead by the power of God for you so that you can live eternally with Him. Pray and ask Him to come into your heart today, and He will. Romans 10:13 says, “For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved.”

Thank you for listening to this Torch Leadership Cross in Culture Podcast.

Visit us online at http://www.torchleadershipfoundation.com

Until we meet again, remember to keep Christ first in our ever-changing culture.

Daniel Whyte III has spoken in meetings across the United States and in twenty-three foreign countries. He is the author of thirty-four books. He is also the president of Gospel Light Society International, a worldwide evangelistic ministry that reaches thousands with the Gospel each week, as well as president of Torch Ministries International, a Christian literature ministry which publishes a monthly magazine called The Torch Leader. He is heard by thousands each week on his radio broadcasts, The Prayer Motivator Devotional and the Prayer Motivator Minute, as well as Gospel Light Minute X, the Gospel Light Minute, the Sunday Evening Evangelistic Message, the Prophet Daniel’s Report and the Second Coming Watch Update. He holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Theology from Bethany Divinity College, a Bachelor’s degree in Religion from Texas Wesleyan University, and a Master’s degree in Religion from Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been married to the former Meriqua Althea Dixon, of Christiana, Jamaica for twenty-five years. God has blessed their union with seven children. Find out more at www.danielwhyte3.com. Follow Daniel Whyte III on Twitter @prophetdaniel3 or on Facebook.

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