Tyler Perry, Jamal Bryant and More Continue to Remember Myles Munroe as Fount of Wisdom

In this Jan. 19, 2011 photo provided by Oral Roberts University, Rev. Myles Munroe preaches during an Oral Roberts University chapel service in Tulsa, Oklahoma. (Mark Moore/AP)
In this Jan. 19, 2011 photo provided by Oral Roberts University, Rev. Myles Munroe preaches during an Oral Roberts University chapel service in Tulsa, Oklahoma. (Mark Moore/AP)

People anticipated something special every time Myles Munroe spoke.

Whether it was a beautifully crafted sermon in front of thousands or the quiet advice he offered heads of state and corporate leaders, Munroe, a globally admired evangelist with ties to the Washington area, was known to offer a unique, simple wisdom.

Munroe, 60, and his wife, Ruth, died Sunday in a plane crash in the Bahamas, leaving his tens of thousands of followers in mourning. Munroe was on his way to chair the 2014 Global Leadership Forum, an annual three-day event that brings together experienced and emerging leaders from many fields.

“It is utterly impossible to measure the magnitude of Dr. Munroe’s loss to the Bahamas and to the world,” said Perry Christie, prime minister of the Bahamas, during a news conference. “He was indisputably one of the most globally recognizable religious figures our nation has ever produced.”

Queen Elizabeth II named ­Munroe an officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire in 1998.

In a world of mega-ministries and corporate religious empires, Munroe was a go-to person, friends and colleagues said. In the days after his death, a raft of celebrities, including movie director Tyler Perry and the music group One Republic offered remembrances on social media.

“The poorest person in the world is the person without a dream’ — Dr. Myles Munroe . . . No words, just heartbreak,” Perry wrote on his Facebook page. “My prayers and thoughts for Dr. Myles Munroe and all aboard that tragic plane crash.”

Munroe was known to travel the world — recently making an appearance in Kenya, for instance — and he was especially familiar to some of the Washington area’s largest congregations, including Jericho City of Praise in Landover and First Baptist Church of Glenarden. Munroe was a popular speaker whether he was headlining a workshop or standing in the pulpit on a Sunday morning.

“Dr. Munroe was practical and personal,” said Bishop Jamal Bryant, pastor of Empowerment Temple in Baltimore. “Whatever he said just made sense, whether you were seated in the balcony or in the pulpit.”

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SOURCE: The Washington Post
Hamil R. Harris

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