In The End, Adrian Peterson Has Set An Example for Black Fathers: Be Present

Peterson-media

It’s hard to write about Adrian Peterson and what he did and has gone through and will go through without angering some folks. So, prepare to be angered.

With the legal side of his case of physically disciplining his child now finalized in Texas, the resounding message to the Minnesota Vikings superstar running back should be this:

Get on with your life and career.

The apparent intensity and over-the-top, even brutal way in which he whipped his 4-year-old son with a switch—causing bruises in his groin area and other parts of his body—crystalized the difference between a father trying to discipline his child and a coward looking to abuse a kid.

That conveyed, here’s the part that might anger you: Peterson was there for his son instead of playing “ghost daddy,” a role that has plagued the Black community.

He was being a father. He cared enough to discipline his son, even if he was wild and beyond reason in his actions.

One of the ills of the Black community has been the lack of men taking care of their sons or even being there to offer advice, lend support and most of all show that a man cares for him.

Their absence in the kids’ lives leaves mothers to play dual roles, which, God bless them for their strength and will, they cannot fully accomplish.

It takes a man to show a son how to be a man. Peterson will become a better father because of his mistake. He accepted a plea deal and avoided jail time and, once lord Roger Goodell, NFL commissioner, weighs in, will be able to resume his stellar career at some point.

As well he should. He rightfully has paid a hefty price for his actions. Public perception of Peterson, widely liked by teammates and most anyone who encounters him, was far from favorable, and despite the agreement to pay a fine and do community service and heartfelt apologies, the view of Peterson as a child abuser for some has been irrevocably cast.

He knows it.

Click here to continue reading.

SOURCE: Atlanta Black Star – Curtis Bunn

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