Rev. Floyd Flake Admits That at One Time He “Didn’t Even Like Politicians”

(PHOTO: THE CHRISTIAN POST/LEONARDO BLAIR) W. Wilson Goode Sr., former mayor of Philadelphia and president of Amachi (R), reacts as Floyd H. Flake (L), former U.S. congressman and senior pastor of Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral in Jamaica, New York, who recounts how he got into politics at the fifth annual Movement Day gathering in New York City, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014.
(PHOTO: THE CHRISTIAN POST/LEONARDO BLAIR)
W. Wilson Goode Sr., former mayor of Philadelphia and president of Amachi (R), reacts as Floyd H. Flake (L), former U.S. congressman and senior pastor of Greater Allen A.M.E. Cathedral in Jamaica, New York, who recounts how he got into politics at the fifth annual Movement Day gathering in New York City, Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014.

Rev. Floyd Flake, senior pastor of the Greater Allen A.M.E Cathedral of New York, who spent 11 years in Congress batting for a better life for constituents in his church community, confessed Thursday that at one time, he “didn’t even like politicians.”

That past peeve, which he shared while explaining how he got into politics with about 1,500 church leaders and ministry workers at the fifth annual Movement Day gathering in New York City Thursday, never stopped him from engaging in civic leadership to better serve his community.

“I had never run for public office, never thought about it. As a matter of fact, I didn’t even like politicians back then, but I got into the race and one Sunday morning I announced to the congregation that I was running,” explained Flake.

He noted, however, that the decision didn’t come without controversy.

“My wife (Elaine) showed up between the 8 o’clock and the 11 o’clock service and said, ‘no you didn’t.’ So it was an interesting moment. And she asked, ‘why would you run for Congress?’ I said, ‘well, we’ll talk about it when we get home.’ She said, ‘we going to the office to talk about it now,'” he continued.

“So we went to the office, we talked about it and the next day the paper wrote a story: ‘Flake Flip-Flops — at one service he said he was running, the next service he said he wasn’t.’ Then when we finished the conversation she said, ‘now you have to run.’ So all of us brothers up here knows what it’s like to have a wife who is in charge,” he quipped. “I did what I knew was a necessity.”

The necessity Flake highlighted in his address, however, was the need for pastors to be tangible agents of change beyond just a sermon when the circumstances require it.

And he explained that when he first came to New York to do ministry in the 1980s the circumstances required him to engage with city leaders.

“I came out of Boston University from dean of students to take a position in New York, and I realized that our young people were not learning and there was a necessity for us to make some kind of changes,” he said.

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SOURCE: The Christian Post
Leonardo Blair

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