10 Reasons Why Church Members Fail to Invite Others to Worship

Do you prompt the members of your congregation to invite people to church? (Lightstock)
Do you prompt the members of your congregation to invite people to church? (Lightstock)

Several years ago, more than one study showed large percentages of unchurched would consider attending a church if someone simply invited them. The problem is not the attitude of the unchurched; rather, it is often the failure of church members to invite others.

When my church consulting teams have asked church members about their reticence to invite others to church, here are 10 responses we have often heard (listed in no particular order):

“I just don’t think about it.” Many church members have contact with the unchurched every week, if not every day. They go to school with them, work with them, live beside them—and sometimes live with them. What church folks don’t do, though, is see the unchurched as “sheep without a shepherd” (Matt. 9:36), as spiritual beings in need of redemption and a church family.

“I’m afraid I’ll be rejected.” Nobody likes to be turned down, especially after taking the risk to invite somebody to church. It’s just easier to avoid that possibility by not inviting anyone at all (interestingly, church members could tell us times when others said “no,” but few could tell us of times when they were rudely or unkindly rejected).

“The music isn’t that good.” Some may argue the worship wars are over, but the battles seem to be ongoing. Our teams continue to hear refrains like, “it’s too loud,” “it’s too boring,” “we sing it over and over again” and “nobody knows the songs.” Church members who themselves don’t enjoy the music don’t readily invite others to join them.

“The preaching isn’t strong.” This response was seemingly the most painful one to admit. Church members who love their pastors do not want to hurt them, but they spoke honestly to our consulting teams. When the preaching is poor, invitations to the unchurched decrease.

“We’ve got too many church problems right now.” Church members don’t always know all the issues facing a congregation, but they frequently recognize when something “just isn’t right.” They see the attendance decreasing, or they hear of internal conflict. Simply stated, they do not invite their friends onto a battleground.

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SOURCE: Charisma News
Chuck Lawless

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