Dr. Ed Stetzer on the Church and Its Response to Domestic and Sexual Violence

RAUL LIEBERWIRTH / FLICKR
RAUL LIEBERWIRTH / FLICKR

Yesterday, I spoke at the Sojourners Summit at Georgetown University in Washington D.C. It’s a diverse gathering focused on engaging the faith community in different aspects community engagement and service.

My role at the Summit was to present research we have recently completed, sponsored by IMA World Health and Sojourners around an important issue: how the church is responding to domestic and sexual violence.

Sojourners explained it this way:

Violence against women was named as a “significant public health issue” by the World Health Organization in 2013, which reported that 35 percent of women around the globe have experienced sexual or physical abuse by a partner or non-partner. And according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the chance of a man experiencing abuse at the hand of an intimate partner was one in four.

What makes this poll unique is that there is not much data on how pastors view and address the issues of domestic and sexual violence. According to Rick Santos, President and CEO of IMA World Health, “there is little information out there about what is actually happening in the U.S. faith community on this issue.”

Despite the poll’s major finding — that pastors underestimate the pervasiveness of sexual and domestic violence in their congregations — the report offers some hope. Of the pastors polled, 81 percent reported that they would “take appropriate action to reduce sexual and domestic violence if they had the training and resources to do so.”

Sojourners recently published I Believe You: Sexual Violence and the Church , a study edited by its president and founder, Jim Wallis, and Catherine Woodiwiss, Associate Web Editor. The study features three essays about women, sexual violence, and their experiences in dealing with their abuse in their churches. It is a step forward in the effort to bring light to an issue that is often cloaked in darkness and to give voices to victims who often feel silenced by the church’s failure to understand the prevalence of sexual and domestic violence.

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: Christianity Today
Ed Stetzer

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