Sleep Longer to Achieve More

Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/g-stockstudio
Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/g-stockstudio

Our society puts a high value on achievement but not much on rest. I hear people brag about how much they work and play but never how much they sleep—usually the opposite. But what if sleep could help you achieve more?

My team and I just finished launching the Get Noticed! Theme for WordPress, and I am fried. We were down late and up early, day after day. Late-night emergencies and early-morning crises were the norm.

My team managed it well, and—thanks to you—it was a successful launch. But I didn’t sleep well for a few weeks there. Maybe you can identify. We just don’t get enough sleep, do we?

The Sleep Deficit

In our high-risk, high-reward economy, there’s a healthy pressure to do more with less. It makes sense with time and money. But it’s a productivity killer when it comes to sleep.

Experts say we need about eight hours a night. But the national average is about 6.8. I got a lot fewer hours than that for several nights during the launch.

And the truth is the real average might even be lower. We usually report how much time we spend in bed, not how much time we actually sleep. It turns out we only get about 80 percent as much sleep as we think.

Why aren’t we getting enough sleep?

The Myth of Sleepless Productivity

Maybe it came too easy for us in college or we’ve watched too many movies, but it’s easy to think that one hour of lost sleep is equal to one hour of bonus productivity. I’m afraid it doesn’t work that way.

I’ve discovered by painful and groggy, first-hand experience that sixty minutes of one does not equal sixty minute of the other.

I’m not saying that we don’t face emergencies and need to give up sleep every now and then. But our lack of sleep isn’t usually about emergencies. For instance, how many product launches have I done this year compared with how many hours of lost sleep? Not enough to explain my sleep deficit.

We act like sleep is a luxury or an indulgence; as a result, sacrificing sleep in the name of productivity has become routine.

But the opposite’s true. Cheating our sleep is like maxing our credit cards. There’s a benefit now—at least, it feels like it—but the bill always comes due in the form of decreased health and mental ability.

No one would choose to be sick and stupid, but depriving our bodies of sleep is the same thing. Robbing our sleep is robbing our productivity.

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: MichaelHyatt.com

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