Seven States Are Reportedly Running Out of Water

Cows in 2012 by a drying-out pond near Paoli, Okla., where drought conditions still exist, according to U.S. Drought Monitor. Currently 30.4% of Oklahoma is under "exceptional drought," the highest percentage of any state. (Photo: Sue Ogrocki, AP)
Cows in 2012 by a drying-out pond near Paoli, Okla., where drought conditions still exist, according to U.S. Drought Monitor. Currently 30.4% of Oklahoma is under “exceptional drought,” the highest percentage of any state.
(Photo: Sue Ogrocki, AP)

The United States is currently engulfed in one of the worst droughts in recent memory. More than 30% of the country experienced at least moderate drought as of last week’s data.

In seven states drought conditions were so severe that each had more than half of its land area in severe drought. Severe drought is characterized by crop loss, frequent water shortages, and mandatory water use restrictions. Based on data from the U.S. Drought Monitor, 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the states with the highest levels of severe drought.

In an interview, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) meteorologist Brad Rippey, told 24/7 Wall St. that drought has been a long-running issue in parts of the country. “This drought has dragged on for three and a half years in some areas, particularly (in) North Texas,” Rippey said.

While large portions of the seven states suffer from severe drought, in some parts of these states drought conditions are even worse. In six of the seven states with the highest levels of drought, more than 30% of each state was in extreme drought as of last week, a more severe level of drought characterized by major crop and pasture losses, as well as widespread water shortages. Additionally, in California and Oklahoma, 25% and 30% of the states, respectively, suffered from exceptional drought, the highest severity classification. Under exceptional drought, crop and pasture loss is widespread, and shortages of well and reservoir water can lead to water emergencies.

Drought has had a major impact on important crops such as winter wheat. “So much of the winter wheat is grown across the southern half of the Great Plains,” Rippey said, an area that includes Texas, Oklahoma, and Kansas, three of the hardest-hit states. Texas alone had nearly a quarter of a million farms in 2012, the most out of any state, while neighboring Oklahoma had more than 80,000 farms, trailing only three other states.

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Source: USA Today | Alexander E.M. Hess and Thomas C. Frohlich, 24/7 Wall St.

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