Two New Experimental Drugs May Help Prevent Migraines

Prevent Migraines

Two experimental drugs may help prevent migraines in people who suffer multiple attacks a month, according to preliminary findings from a pair of clinical trials.

The drugs, one given by IV and one by injection, are part of a new approach to preventing migraine headaches. They are “monoclonal antibodies” that target a tiny protein called the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) — which recent research has implicated in triggering migraine pain.

In one study, patients saw a 66 percent reduction in their migraine attacks five to eight weeks after a single dose of the IV drug — known for now as ALD403. That compared with a 52 percent decrease among patients who were given a placebo, or inactive, infusion.

In the other trial, patients receiving the injection drug saw a similar benefit from three months’ worth of biweekly treatments.

The findings, scheduled to be presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Neurology’s annual meeting in Philadelphia, are preliminary. And experts stressed that many questions remain.

Still, migraine sufferers can “take heart” that new drugs, specific to the pain condition, are under development, said Dr. Peter Goadsby, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco, who worked on both studies.

Right now, he said, the drugs used to prevent migraines are all older medications that were originally developed to treat other conditions. They include certain antidepressants, high blood pressure medications and anti-seizure drugs.

In contrast, the experimental medications aimed at CGRP are the first “designer drugs” for preventing migraine, said Dr. Richard Lipton, a headache expert who was not involved in the studies.

These early findings are “very encouraging,” said Lipton, who directs the Montefiore Headache Center in New York City. “To me, this proves the concept that targeting CGRP can be effective,” he said.

However, larger, longer-term studies are still needed to confirm the drugs’ effectiveness and safety, Lipton and Goadsby said.

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SOURCE: WebMD News from HealthDay
Amy Norton

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