Religious Freedom Remains a Low Priority for U.S. Leaders

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a lunch with a group of teachers at the Blue Room of the White House July 7, 2014 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images North America
U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a lunch with a group of teachers at the Blue Room of the White House July 7, 2014 in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong/Getty Images North America

In the U.S., President Obama and religious freedom don’t exactly have a “winning” relationship. Last fall, U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom Suzanne Cook resigned from her position, citing the need for a “higher salary” to support her children’s educations.

Nine months down the road, the Obama administration has yet to nominate a replacement.

President Obama and religious freedom were at-odds again in February at the National Prayer Breakfast. Four months after Cook’s resignation, President Obama stated, “We will keep standing for religious freedom around the world…I look forward to nominating our next Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom to help lead these efforts.”

On a separate but related note, the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on the widely-criticized Hobby Lobby case came as a surprising “win” for religious freedom.

The lack of care for religious freedom–both internationally and at home–is a far cry from the intent of U.S. Pilgrims.

“They saw this continent, this New World, as a beachhead from which to evangelize the entire world,” shares David Shibley of Global Advance. “From the very beginning, the Pilgrims were sharing the Gospel with Native Americans.

“There was a very clear understanding that a cherished faith, if it truly was cherished, had to be advanced, and had to be propagated and shared.”

Click here to read more.

SOURCE: MNN
Katey Hearth

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